Fishing for rainbow trout on Pennesseewassee Lake, Norway, Oxford County, Maine (April 25, 2020)

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The public boat launch has ample parking space

 

Pennesseewassee Lake (a.k.a. Norway Lake) is a 922-acre body of water located in Norway, Oxford County, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 11 D1). Public access is through a high-quality boat launch off Waterford Road. Coming in from Harrison, drive north on Route 117 all the way to the lake. Turn left at the stop sign on Waterford Road, go for 0.3 miles, and then turn right at the boat launch sign. An aggressive annual stocking program has turned this pretty lake into an easily-accessible regional rainbow trout fishery powerhouse, with secondary fishing for landlocked Atlantic salmon and brook trout. The lake is moderately developed and consists of a larger lower basin and a smaller upper basin, separated by several islands. During open-water fishing, most people tend to focus their efforts on the lower basin because of its closeness to the boat launch. One negative about this general area is that the constant traffic on Lake Road (i.e., Routes 117/118) is visible and audible from the water. Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information. Maine’s general fishing laws apply during spring open-water fishing.

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Trout fishing on Little Penneseewassee Pond, Norway, Maine (January 20, 20123)

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Little Penneseewassee Pond is a 96-acre body of water located alongside Route 118 in Norway, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 10 D5). Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.

 

My son Joel and I arrive at Little Penneseewassee Pond at 8:15 am. The fishing conditions are perfect this morning: the air temperature is 18°F but without an atom of wind, the rising sun is hidden behind the trees which cast deep shadows along the entire shoreline, the ice is a solid 12” with 4” of snow on top, and a low pressure is forecast to move through the region later on in the day. Joel calls up a depth map of the pond on his cell phone; it shows a relatively narrow band of shallow water running along the Route 118 shoreline, wich is flanked by a very steep drop to a depth of 24 ft. The deepest spot of the lake is 29 ft.

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