Largemouth bass fishing on Alewife Pond, Kennebunk, Maine (June 29, 2014)

View Map

The entrance marker on Cole Road to the Alewife Woods Preserve

The entrance marker on Cole Road to the Alewife Woods Preserve

Alewife Pond is a 37-acre body of water located in Kennebunk, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 2 C5). The pond is accessible by driving north on Cole Road from Alfred Road for about 0.6 miles, and turning right on the Alewife Woods Preserve (look for the sign on the right of the road). Leave your car at the small parking lot about 300 ft in. The 625-acre Preserve is owned and managed by the Kennebunk Land Trust. The Preserve is well worth a visit for its quiet, wooded and isolated setting within a short drive of several popular nearby coastal resorts. It has 2.5 miles of easy trails to support outdoors activities in the summer (e.g., walking, bird watching, dirt biking) and winter (e.g., snow shoeing and cross-country skiing). Fires, motorized vehicles, and camping are not allowed. Click here for more information on the Preserve.

 

 

 

 

 

General view of Alewife Pond from the rough access point

General view of Alewife Pond from the rough access point

 

 

I reach the parking lot at 9 am with my nephew Christian. I brought my “canoe wheels” with me today because Alewife Pond is located about 1 mile from the parking lot! We ratched-strap the wheels to the canoe, load up all our fishing gear, and start hauling everything down the path. It is already hot and humid this morning and I quickly start sweating profusely. Eleven year-olds can only provide so much pulling power… Many varieties of winged stinging critters are also out for a blood meal this morning and it certainly looks that we are their menu! The trail to the pond is mostly flat and well maintained, except for a washed out and eroded section. I have got to empty out the canoe and carry it on my back for several hundred feet uphill until I make it to flatter ground. We finally reach our destination 35 minutes later tired but glad to have arrived. Note that The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer shows a rough access point at the tip of a peninsula on the northern side of the pond. I do not know where the trail leading to that location starts (presumably Cole Road) or if it is accessible for public use.

 

Seeking shade from the relentlessly hot sun!

Seeking shade from the relentlessly hot sun!

Alewife Pond is gorgeous! The surrounding landscape is completely forested. Only two houses are (barely) visible from the water and the shoreline has no docks. The surface water is slightly stained and the substrate consists mostly of a layer of organic muck on top of fine sand. Abundant aquatic vegetation grows along much of the pond’s edges, providing good habitat for largemouth bass. Some sunken wood is present, but it is rather sparse. The bass fishing rules on this pond fall under the General Law provisions. The pond has a maximum depth of 12 ft and an average depth of 7 ft, making it quite shallow. Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.

 

 

 

 

 

A proud fisherman with his catch

A proud fisherman with his catch

We paddle the canoe on the right-hand side of our launching spot to fish in the shadow line. The sun is blazing hot in an azure sky and it is wind still. I start probing the terrain with a noisy buzzbait, whereas Christian sticks to the lure he loves, namely a 5” soft stick bait. We cast our lures in and along the aquatic vegetation but don’t generate any interest in 45 minutes of hard fishing. Mmm, that doesn’t bode well… We slowly work our way further along and I finally land a tiny 12” largemouth bass after another 30 minutes. I’m underwhelmed! We reach the peninsula where The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer showed the rough boat launch. There’s an overturned canoe and a path that leads away. I explore it a bit and on my return notice a big tree trunk in the water associated with an abandoned beaver lodge. I like beaver lodges because they’re always associated with lots of sunken wood which invariably attracts largemouths. I point it out to Christian and we both cast stick baits towards the spot. I catch two bass and Christian lands one in less than 5 minutes, and then the bite stops (we most likely spooked the remaining fish…). It’s a great little location but the fish are still small.

 

 

Paddling back after a few hours of fun fishing on Alewife Pond

Paddling back after a few hours of fun fishing on Alewife Pond

I ask Christian to look around and select the best-looking spot in the neighborhood because we only have 15 minutes left before we need to paddle back. I do this to teach him to “read” the water and pick the most-promising spots. He immediately points to the exact location I would have chosen: the trees cast a deep shadow, bushes and some submerged branches create good hiding habitat, the water is from 1 to 4 ft deep, the shoreline is irregular and dented, and floating and emergent aquatic vegetation is interspersed in and around the area. I position the canoe about 30 ft away from shore and put in the anchor. The results are immediate: I catch four bass and Christian lands three in less than 10 minutes, and we double hook twice in a row! Wow, what explosive fun! But all these bass are once again small (11”-14”). I’m starting to believe that the largemouth bass population in Alewife Pond is stunted. I do want to take a closer look at this choice spot before we depart to see what caused so many fish to congregate there. The reason is obvious: the bottom is carpeted with hundreds of sticks from an old sunken beaver lodge!

 

 

The results: I caught seven largemouth bass (size range = 11” to 14”) and Christian caught four largemouth bass (size range = 10” to 13”) in two and a half hours of fishing.

 

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

 

                                                        ~ ~ ~ ~ ><« ({(« º >

 

Related Posts:

Advertisements

One thought on “Largemouth bass fishing on Alewife Pond, Kennebunk, Maine (June 29, 2014)

  1. I grew up across the street from the preserve entrance. This pond is where I learned all the early fundamentals of bass fishing. thankful for its location being a bit of a hassle to access otherwise it would not be as sacred. It’s all about timing here. The big ones are easily persuaded in the spring/early summer. My favorite time to fish here is October and May. If anyone is planning a trip please be respectful of the area and the fish. West K has some hidden gems, although most ponds are private there is a handful that are home to bass over 7lbs

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *