Trout fishing on Worthley Pond, Poland Spring, Maine (November 21, 2015)

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The public launch on Worthley Pond can accommodate small trailered boats

The public launch on Worthley Pond can accommodate small trailered boats

Worthley Pond is a 42-acre body of water located in the town of Poland Spring, Androscoggin County (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 A3). To reach the public access point to this lake, turn east onto  Route 122 from Route 26 and drive for about 1.2 miles, passing the brown sign to Range Pond State Park, before turning right on Worthley Pond Road. Keep in mind that several portions of this access road are rather rough, but passable with a regular car. The boat launch itself is unimproved and sandy, but can accommodate small powered boats. Up to several cars can be parked opposite of the launch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Worthley Pond is quite pretty, with little shore development

Worthley Pond is quite pretty, with little shore development

Worthley Pond is a pretty lake located just to the south of Range Pond State Park. The lake is surprisingly undeveloped, considering its close proximity to the Lewiston-Auburn metro area. In fact, except for the discrete facilities associated with the Camp North Star summer camp, the entire shoreline is devoid of houses and docks. The surrounding landscape is also completely forested, providing a great feeling of isolation, although I’m sure that things must get quite hectic when camp is up and running in the summer! The surface water of Worthley Pond is crystal clear. It has a maximum and mean depth of 46 ft and 14 ft. The State nicely stocks the pond each fall with brook trout and brown trout in preparation for the ice fishing season. As a result, this water has long been a popular winter destination for the local hard-water fishing crowd. I checked the latest stocking report (click here) before starting my trip today to make sure that I’d hit the pond after the new batch of trout have been released.  Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.  Click here to learn more about the fall trout fishing rules that apply to this pond.

 

 

Christian's hands are not warming up and he is starting to loose interest...

Christian’s hands are not warming up and he is starting to loose interest…

I reach Worthley Pond with my 13-year old nephew Christian at 7 am. It’s a wind-still but cold (29°F) morning. In fact, we notice that a thin skin of ice has formed in the shallows right by the launch. The real cold can’t be too far behind! The sky is mostly overcast, resulting in reduced light levels, which is always good for trolling. Our game plan this morning is to try to catch some of the recently-stocked trout, in the hope of repeating the amazing fishing experience from last week (click here for details). I‘ll troll with my portable down rigger, whereas Christian will be fishing with lead core line. We each use two small trout spoons, with the back lure tied to the hook of the front lure by 2 ft of monofilament, in order to create more flash. We motor off at around 7:30 am and spend over an hour fishing the relatively shallow lobe in the vicinity of the boat launch. I keep the boat in less than 10 ft of water with the lures placed about half-way down. We’re both warmly dressed, but Christian complains constantly that he can’t get his hands warmed up, even though he’s using gloves and mittens… The net result of all our fishing effort so far is one lousy 10” pickerel! Clearly, the trout are not in the shallows today.

 

 

 

 

The only trout this morning is caught right underneath the surface in 22 ft of water.

The only trout this morning is caught right underneath the surface in 22 ft of water.

I motor my way into the much deeper, lower half of Worthley Pond. I reel in my lures just to check for snagged vegetation before starting a new run. I cast my lures behind the boat after cleaning them out. I suddenly feel angry resistance at the other end as I’m grabbing my trolling weight to clip on the fishing line. Holy cow, I’ve caught a brook trout trolling right underneath the surface in 22 ft of water! We’re hoping that this is the beginning of a trend and therefore start trolling with our lures right below the surface in 20+ ft of water. We’re still waiting for the next trout 30 minutes later… We continue trolling in the lower half of the pond but now right up against the shoreline in <10 ft of water. Christian’s hands still haven’t warmed up and he stops fishing altogether, declaring “Uncle Stan, you’ve lost me this morning!” I ask him to give me another 30 minutes to see if I can turn things around. But the writing is on the wall loud and clear: the trout are in no mood to bite. I call it good 15 minutes later. Christian is ecstatic; he just can’t wait to place his cold hands on the car heater!

 

 

 

 

I definitely lost him now...

I definitely lost him now…

The results: I caught one 13” brook trout and a miniscule pickerel, whereas Christian got skunked, after 2.5 hours of trolling.

 

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

 

 

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