Trout fishing on Pineland Pond in New Gloucester, Maine (May 5, 2013)


View Larger Map

You have arrived!

You have arrived!

Pineland Pond is a small, 1-acre pond located next to Route 231 on land belonging to Pineland Farm, in New Gloucester, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 C4, although the pond itself is not shown; navigate to the spot using Google Maps instead ). This body of water is an extremely popular brook trout pond for spring fishing because it is well-stocked and provides easy access. The entire periphery of the pond is also clear of brush and trees, which makes it one of the few ponds in the area that can be readily fly fished from shore. A small parking lot by the pond next to Route 231 can accommodate about ten cars or so. General fishing rules apply. Every year, Pineland Pond is stocked once in April and once in May with a total of about 350 10” brook trout. Do the math: this small body of water is stocked with an average of around 350 brookies per acre each spring!! This makes it, by far, the best-stocked pond in the whole of Cumberland County! I doubt, however, that any of the trout survive the hot summer months because the pond appears to be relatively shallow.

 

General view of Pineland Pond in New Gloucester, Maine

General view of Pineland Pond in New Gloucester, Maine

 

I arrive at Pineland Pond with my wife, my five-year old granddaughter Ariana and ten-year old nephew Christian at around 2:30 pm. It’s a gorgeous Sunday, with full sunshine and air temps in the low 60’s but with a stiff southeastern breeze. My goal this afternoon is to make sure that Christian continues to catch trout. I’ve taken him out three times this spring and he’s had brookies for diner every time! He’s excited about fishing and I want to make sure that it stays that way. It’s clear that he’ll have some serious competition: the parking lot is overflowing and there are about a dozen kids and adults fishing along the shoreline. Several adults and their kids are also walking around with dipnets to catch tadpoles and frogs. It’s quite a beehive of activity!

 

Christian showing off his catch with Ariana

Christian showing off his catch with Ariana

Most of the fishing efforts are concentrated along the cement retaining wall by the outlet: this structure is easy to stand on or sit on and also faces the deepest part of the pond. Everyone is fishing with bobbers and worms and there’s an easy camaraderie going on. Ariana takes off to hang around with the kids who are dipping for tadpoles. Christian is focused on his fishing, though, and it pays off: he hooks and lands three brookies over the next 2.5 hours. He’s staying excited alright!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Life is good, really good!

Life is good, really good!

I see no rises until later in the afternoon when the sun gets lower in the sky, most people have left for the day, and the general commotion has died down. I talk to a guy who’s sitting in his car at the parking lot watching the activity. He tells me of a hatch the week before when the surface of the pond was boiling with rises. The fishing on Pineland Pond is definitely better during the work week when the shoreline is quiet and the fish are less spooked. The easy access and abundant brook trout population makes it definitely a choice spot to spend an hour or two fishing in the early evening when things are winding down from a long day at work. I definitely recommend spending some time on this pond.

 

 

 

 

The results: Christian caught three brookies (all about 10”) in 2.5 hours of fishing.

 

Pineland Pond, New Gloucester, Maine
 

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences on this pond.   

 

Related Posts:

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Trout fishing on Pineland Pond in New Gloucester, Maine (May 5, 2013)

    • The website of the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife states the following: “No resident of this state, 16 years of age or older, or nonresident, 12 years of age or older, may fish in inland waters or transport fish taken from inland waters without first obtaining a valid Maine fishing license”. Moe information is available at http://www.eregulations.com/maine/fishing/license-requirements. Best of luck on Pineland Pond. The state stuffs it full of brook trout each spring!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *