Largemouth bass fishing on Mill Pond, Windham, Maine (June 9, 2013)

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The outlet of Little Sebago Lake into Mill Pond

The outlet of Little Sebago Lake into Mill Pond

Mill Pond is a 10-acre impoundment formed by the outlet of Little Sebago Lake in Windham (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 C2). The downstream end of this small pond is dammed. The ouflow pouring over this dam forms Ditch Brook which flows underneath Route 115 and eventually into Collins Pond further downstream. The water in Mill pond is crystal clear. The substrate consists mostly of boulders and cobbles. The maximum depth is about 35 ft. Around a dozen houses dot the shoreline.

 

 

 

 

 

 


This largemouth bass fell for a stickbait coming down the current from the spill way in Mill Pond

This largemouth bass fell for a stickbait coming down the current from the spill way in Mill Pond


 

 

Mill Pond does not have a public boat launch. We reach it via a friend’s backyard that abuts the pond.  The pond experiences little fishing pressure because of its lack of public access but is also LOADED with very naïve largemouth bass! There’s also an added bonus to keep in mind: some of the rainbow trout which are stocked annually in Little Sebago Lake wash over the outlet structure and get stuck in this pond. Those fish, which have slowly accumulated over the years, have grown fat and may be worth targeting through the ice or in the spring and fall.

 

Joel showing off a nice Mill Pond largemouth bass

Joel showing off a nice Mill Pond largemouth bass


My son Joel, 10-year old nephew Christian, and myself fish Mill Pond on an inflatable dingy and a canoe in mid-afternoon. The weather is gorgeous with temps in the high 70’s. The water temperature on the surface is a surprisingly warm 75°F. A quick look-around shows that a good spot to target largemouth bass appears to be the upper end of the pond to the right (looking downstream) of the outlet structure: the water in that general area is relatively shallow (< 7 ft) and weedy. We also spot Eurasian milfoil, an invasive plant species which must have washed in from Little Sebago via its outlet. We’re early enough in the season so that this pest hasn’t overtaken the shallows yet. We notice few largemouth bass nests; it looks like the spawn is largely over.

 

 

 

 

A picture is worth a 1000 words... Christian's first ever largemouth bass caught on a soft stickbait

A picture is worth a 1000 words… Christian’s first ever largemouth bass caught on a soft stickbait

All three of us toss soft stickbaits in and around the lily pads and along the shoreline. Christian in particular is excited: he’s graduated from worm fishing to artificials, and is very proud about it. In fact, today is the first time that he’s fishing with a stickbait. The outcome of our efforts and strategy is absolutely spectacular. We simply lose count of how many largemouth bass are caught over the next three hours but we guess about 40, five of which are landed by Christian! Most of these fish are relatively small (12”-14”), but enough are in the 14” to 17” range to keep things interesting. Joel also hooks into but loses a monster which is still swimming around with a hook in it’s mouth. That’s what you get for fishing largemouths with stickbaits using an ultralight… We have a memorable afternoon and promise ourselves to pay a return visit to this pretty pond in the future.

 

The results: We caught around 40 largemouth bass in 3 hours of fantastic fishing.

 

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

 

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