Largemouth bass fishing on Jimmy Pond in Litchfield, Maine (August 15, 2015)

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View of the entrance of the wide and weedy stream that connects Jimmy Pond to Buker Pond

View of the entrance of the wide and weedy stream that connects Jimmy Pond to Buker Pond

Jimmy Pond is a 40-acre body of water located in Litchfield, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 12 E3). It is the most-upgradient pond in the Tacoma Lakes chain. This pond should not be confused with Jimmie Pond (a.k.a. Jamies Pond) which is located in the Jamies Pond Wildlife Management Area in Manchester (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 12 C4). Jimmy Pond cannot be accessed directly. Instead, it is reached via a wide weedy stream which connects it to Buker Pond located further downstream. The launch on Buker Pond is off Buker Street, which runs between Buker Pond and Sand Pond. Beware that Buker Street is completely hemmed in by road safety barriers for 1000+ ft on either side of the launch. A small parking area is located next to the launch, but can accommodate no more than 3 small cars. Extra parking is available on the road shoulder, but only passed the road safety barriers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The entrance to Jimmy Pond viewed from the stream

The entrance to Jimmy Pond viewed from the stream

 

 

The Buker Pond launch can only accommodate hand-carried craft. Also, I found Buker Street to be quite a busy road which one must cross to go from the parking area to the access point on Buker Pond. Finally, Jimmy Pond can be reached using a motor boat by launching at the northern end of Woodbury Pond (see the Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 12 D3) and then navigating south into Sand Pond, Buker Pond, and Jimmy Pond via the aforementioned stream. I did not check this route personally but Google Map shows a thoroughfare connecting Woodbury Pond to Sand Pond, and I saw motor boats navigating between Sand Pond and Buker Pond. The one note of caution is that the stream gets quite shallow (1 ft or less) for a short stretch as it enters Buker Pond.

 

View of the western shoreline of Jimmy Pond with Danforth Hill in the background

View of the western shoreline of Jimmy Pond with Danforth Hill in the background

Jimmy Pond is a half-secluded lake because of its challenging access. The unnamed stream linking it to Buker Pond is quite pretty. It is actually inaccurate to call it a “stream” because it hardly flows. It is wide and runs through a forested corridor. It takes about 20-25 minutes to paddle from the launch on Buker Pond to the entrance of Jimmy Pond. The stream itself is definitely worth exploring further as it must contain largemouth bass due to the high quality of its holding habitat, which consists of vast expanses of aquatic vegetation along both shorelines. I didn’t spend much time fishing it due to my tight schedule. The setting of the stream is also very pleasing due to a total lack of human infrastructure along the way. One gets a real sense of isolation and quietness, which is always enjoyable. Jimmy Pond itself is quite pleasing. The pond is moderately developed, but only along its eastern shoreline. The western half of the shoreline is dominated by Danforth Hill. That shoreline, together with the general area where the pond connects to the stream, supports most of the aquatic vegetation on this pond. The surface water is clean and clear, but develops a severe oxygen deficiency 15+ ft deep during the summer. The pond has a maximum and average depth of 32 ft and 14 ft, respectively. Click here for a depth map and additional fisheries information.

 

 

The western shoreline of Jimmy Pond is undeveloped and contains lots of aquatic vegetation

The western shoreline of Jimmy Pond is undeveloped and contains lots of aquatic vegetation

My 12-year old nephew Christian and I arrive at the Buker Pond access point around 10:00 am. We launch my canoe and start paddling our way up to Jimmy Pond. The work involved is not too bad because we’re being pushed along by a gentle breeze. We’re going to have to pay the piper on our way back though… Even though it’s only mid-morning, the sun is already bright and hot. We reach the pond in due time and start fishing the weeds in 1-4 ft of water along the western shoreline using stickbaits, buzzbaits, and plastic frogs. We pound that entire shoreline for a good hour but do not generate a single strike! I suspect that the intense sunlight has chased the bass deeper into the water column and/or deeper inside the tangle of aquatic plants. We paddle towards the eastern shoreline to investigate but the available habitat is definitely more sparse. Another 45 minutes of fishing in that general area yields one bite on Christian’s stickbait but no fish. We call ourselves defeated and paddle back into the wind towards Buker Pond, to loud groaning by my nephew : – )

 

 

 

 

Even though the largemouth bass fishing on Jimmy Pond was a disappointment this morning, I highly recommend it for further investigation. The wide stream connecting this pond to Buker Pond represents a sweet bonus which definitely requires more attention. The two combined make for a worthy fishing destination.

 

The results: We were both skunked in about 2 hours of fishing.

 

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Largemouth bass fishing on Jimmy Pond in Litchfield, Maine (August 15, 2015)

  1. Hi Stan,I once fished this pond too with similar results,but had much better luck on Buker Pond on my way out.
    A pond or ponds I highly recommend up in that area are Upper/Lower Narrows.You can access Upper Narrow off rte 202 I think in Winthrop.It has a nice parking area at the Northern end,but you have to carry a kayak or canoe approx 100′ to the water through a short wooded trail.When you put in however,you are right where some of the best prime Largemouth habitat.
    I stumbled across this pond by chance,and once had the fishing trip of a lifetime.It was late August approx 8yrs ago,kind of a cloudy drizzly day.
    Stan,I caught 54 bass in 5hrs!My biggest that day was around 6-7lbs.I caught numerous 3-4 pounders.It has some nice Smallmouth too.This is one pond that I have consistently caught large fish on each time I have visited.I actually hope to get back there before the season is over.

    Take Care,
    -Tom.

    • Unfortunately, the picture rotation appears to be a browser- and/or device-related issue that cannot be fixed from my end. It is an annoyance which I hope will not prevent those affected from enjoying the information.

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