Brook trout fishing on Panther Run, Raymond, Maine (April 28, 2014)

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View of Panther Run from the dam

View of Panther Run from the dam

Panther Run (a.k.a. the Jordan River) is the outlet of Panther Pond. It starts at the Panther Pond dam by Mill Street and runs for roughly 1.5 river miles until it flows underneath Route 302 into Sebago Lake in Raymond. In early spring, melt water from the Crescent Lake and Panther Pond watersheds pours out into Panther Run via a long shute in the dam. This action creates a raging, roiling pool at the foot of the dam which attracts lots of brook trout. Note that the State stocks Panther Run each spring with several hundred brookies once in April and twice in May. Click here for the latest fish stocking data.

 

 

 

 

 

View of the dam by Mill Street

View of the dam by Mill Street

 

 

This location on Panther Run is a well-known, early-spring trout fishing hole which draws much interest from local anglers. Cars can be parked off Mill Street on either side of the dam. Keep in mind though that the place gets quite hectic on the weekends when a dozen people can be found fishing the area below the dam. The best time to have this spot all to yourself in the spring is early in the morning on a week day.

 

The brook trout honey hole on Panther Run

The brook trout honey hole on Panther Run

I roll out of bed ungodly early on Monday morning and arrive at Panther Run at 5:45 am. I’m alone, which always suites me fine. The water flowing over the dam is fierce and noisy; the snow melt is still on-going! I pass the fence on the right side of the dam (looking downstream), walk around the green cabin located at the water’s edge and set up shop on the retaining wall in front of it. My experience is that the brookies like to hide in the relatively quiet pool across from the cabin between the retaining wall, the aluminum fish ladder and the water roaring down the shute.

 

 

 

 

 

This little guy is coming home for breakfast!

This little guy is coming home for breakfast!

The best way to entice these trout is to slowly drag a ball of live wriggling worms on the bottom of the pool. Make sure to pinch two or more large split shots about 1 ft above the hook to allow the line to quickly sink down before it gets swept away by the current. Also, be prepared to get stuck on the bottom as the current jostles your rig around… I hook my first brookie of the morning after about 15 minutes of fishing. Three more follow over the next 45 minutes. All are small (8”-10”) and stocked, which is typical for this location. I keep one fish for breakfast and release the rest to be caught by someone else some other day. Two fisherman arrive at 6:45 am to try their luck; I enjoyed my “alone” time this morning and pack up to start the work day with a smile on my face : )

 

 

The results: I caught 4 brook trout measuring between 8” and 10” in 1 hour.

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

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