Brook trout fishing on Abol Pond, Baxter State Park, Maine (May 25, 2017)

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View of the rough access point to Abol Pond from the Park Tote Road

Abol Pond covers 70 acres and is located alongside the Park Tote Road in Baxter State Park, about two miles from the Togue Pond Gate (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 50 D5). Remarkably, given its relatively small surface area, the pond is about 1.2 miles long and has 3.4 miles of shoreline! This narrow and convoluted body of water consists of an eastern and western basin connected by a long and shallow thoroughfare. Both basins, but the eastern one in particular, provide spectacular views of Abol Mountain with majestic Mount Katahdin looming in the background. The pond can be accessed from two different locations. The easiest one is situated at the Abol Beach picnic area by the outlet on the western basin. The only problem with this launch area is that one then has to paddle one mile to reach the eastern basin. The alternative access point is located right off the Park Tote Road next to the pond at the point where the road dips down to pass over a large culvert. This access point, which is more central, is down a relatively steep bank by the road. I use the latter this morning.

 

 

The alternative access point to Abol Pond is at the Abol Beach picnic area located at the outlet on the western basin

 

 

Abol Pond receives a modest stocking of brook trout each fall to supplement the existing native trout population. The water is slightly stained but is otherwise clear. The substrate consists of a mixture of gravel and boulders, and soft muddy bottom. The shoreline is free of any human structure (except by the picnic area) and completely surrounded by deep woods. The sporadic traffic on the nearby Park Tote Road is unobtrusive. This pond has a mean and maximum depth of 6 ft and 36 ft, respectively, and is therefore quite shallow on average. The deep hole in the eastern basin serves as a summer cold-water refuge for the local trout population. Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information. General fishing laws fishing laws apply on this pond, except that (a) it is closed to ice fishing, (b) use or possession of live fish as bait is prohibited, (c) dead fish, salmon eggs, or worms can be used as bait, (d) the daily limit on trout is two fish, and (e) motorboats or outboard motors are prohibited.

 

A spectacular view of Abol Mountain and Mount Katahdin from Abol Pond. What a treat!

I arrive at the rough access point along the Park Tote Road by 6 am. The sky is overcast and the air temperature is in the upper 40’s. A light breeze blows in from the southeast, keeping mosquitoes and blackflies under control. I notice that the water level in Abol Pond is unusually high, as indicated by the submerged vegetation along the shoreline. I apply my usual canoe trolling technique, namely two rods crisscrossed between my legs and each fishing from opposite sides of the canoe with two different lures set at two different depths. One rod uses lead core line, whereas the other uses monofilament with several large split shots crimped 3 ft above the top lure.

 

 

 

I did not get skunked this morning!!

I paddle around the eastern basin several times but generate no strikes. Mmm, that is not a good sign. I move through the thoroughfare with my lures trailing just below the surface. Again, no takers. I enter the western basin and troll all the way to the outlet. I realize now why the water appears so high: busy beavers built a dam across the outlet, thereby raising the water level on the pond by well over a foot. I finally get my one and only hit of the morning in the western basin while paddling in the direction of the thoroughfare. It’s a darkly-colored, healthy-looking 13” brook trout which puts up a spirited fight. Unfortunately, the treble hook is deeply embedded inside the fish’s head and I just can’t retrieve the lure without damaging the creature. This little guy is coming back to camp and will become part of my breakfast.

 

 

 

 

The results: I caught one 13” brook trout in 2.5 hours of peaceful paddling.

 

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

 

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