Ice fishing for brook trout on Otter Pond #4, Standish, Maine (December 18, 2016)

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We’re not the only ones interested in ice fishing the Otter Ponds this morning!!

Otter Pond #4 (a.k.a. Snake Pond) covers 6 acres and is located in Standish, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D1). Click here for directions and here for a depth map. This blog identifies this small body of water as a top brook trout destination in Cumberland County for the 2017 ice fishing season. Both Otter Pond #4, and its larger sibling Otter Pond #2, are popular early ice fishing destinations in this part of southern Maine. The ponds reliably freeze over in December due to their small sizes and are also densely stocked with brook trout each fall. They represent the typical “put-and-take” winter trout fishery where the action is red-hot for the first three or four weeks of the hard-water season but then slows down considerably as more and more of the stocked brookies are harvested for the dinner table.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Little Watchic Pond in Standish, Maine (August 5, 2016)

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The muddy access point at the southern end of the southern arm of Little Watchic Pond can only accommodate hand-carried craft

The muddy access point at the southern end of the southern arm of Little Watchic Pond can only accommodate hand-carried craft

Little Watchic Pond is a 55-acre body of water located in Standish, Maine (see the Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 D5). Click here for directions on how to access this pond. I haven’t fished it for several years now and am eager to give it a try again. In the past, I rarely had to share this water with other anglers, which is surprising given its close proximity to several towns in the surrounding area. I guess that may be due to its hidden nature and its relative inaccessibility. However, the place can get noisy if people are target shooting in the nearby gravel pit. Also, years ago, two guys placed a long line of buoys to create a water skiing obstacle course in the southern arm. I’m actually surprised to observe upon arrival today that the buoys are still there! Given the small size of the pond, the water gets noisy and wavy when these two do their practice runs. Fortunately for me, no one is shooting or water skiing when I reach my destination.

 

 

 

 

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Ice fishing for trout on Otter Pond #4, Standish, Maine (January 19, 2014)

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General view of Otter Pond #4

General view of Otter Pond #4

Otter Pond #4 (a.k.a. Snake Pond) covers 6 acres and is located off Route 35 in Standish, Cumberland County (see the Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D1). Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information. This small body of water is an extremely popular brook trout ice fishing destination in southern Maine. To access this pond, park your car on the small gravel parking lot next to the road bridge over the old railroad tracks. Walk down to the tracks, turn left, and walk for about 10 minutes. You’ll pass Otter Pond #1 (a.k.a. Half Moon Pond) on the right, Otter Pond # 3 on the left, quickly followed by Otter Pond #2 on your right. Get off the tracks and walk to the left around a wooded knoll. Otter #4 will soon appear on your left.   

 

 

 

 

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Trout fishing on Otter Pond #2, Standish, Maine (November 10, 2013)

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General view of Otter Pond #2

General view of Otter Pond #2

Otter Pond #2 is a 12-acre body of water located in Standish, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D1; note that on the Google map above, Otter Pond #2 is the pond just below the one indicated by the red pin). Read this blog for directions on how to access this pond. Otter Pond #2 is a widely popular spot for early ice fishing, but gets little or no pressure in the fall after it is stocked for the winter season.  My son Joel and I arrive at the largest of the two parking lots off Route 35 by 8:15 am. As expected, we’re all by ourselves, which suits us just fine. We place his canoe on canoe wheels, load up the car battery, electric trolling engine, and our fishing gear in the boat, and haul everything down the Mountain Division Trail to our destination. I checked the stocking report on-line the day before; the State released a truckload of brookies in this pond last week which should make for good fishing.

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Trout fishing on Otter Pond #2, Standish, Maine (April 14, 2013)

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Otter Pond #2 is a 12-acre body of water located in Standish, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D1). My son Joel and I arrive at the largest of the two parking lots off Route 35 by 7:15 am. We place his motorized canoe on canoe wheels, load up the engine and our fishing gear in the boat, and haul everything for about a mile down the Mountain Division Trail. Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information. We were quite successful catching trout on this pond in November of last year (click here and here for more details) and are looking for a repeat this time.  The state stocked this water body on Tuesday April 9, 2012 with lots of 10” brookies, but spiced up the action with much larger 16” brookies, which are the focus of our attention today.

 

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Trout fishing on Otter Pond #2, Standish, Maine (January 6, 2013)

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Otter Pond #2 is a 12-acre body of water located off Route 35 in Standish, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D1). Read this blog for information on trout stocking and directions. The state stocks Otter Pond #2 with lots of brookies each fall to support fast early-season ice fishing.

 

It’s still dark when I get to the parking lot by Route 35 at 6:30 am. I’m expecting a lot of competition today (Sunday) and want to make sure that I can get to my favorite spot on the pond. The only other person at the parking lot arrives a minute before me and gets on the ice first. He sets up exactly where I wanted to fish today!!  I place myself next to him and proceed to drill my five holes and set out my traps. The ice is 5” to 6” thick, which is plenty safe.  I’m placing my small shiners in water 4 to 8 ft deep right alongside the shoreline. My son Joel and I caught over two dozen brook trout in this area when we trolled the pond in mid-November of 2012 (click here for details).

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Trout fishing on Otter Pond #2, Standish, Maine (November 18, 2012)

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Joel and I decide to again visit Otter Pond #2 in Standish (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D1) after our successful trout fishing experience last week (click here on how to access this 12-acre pond). The Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife nicely stocks the pond with a truckload of brook trout each spring and fall. Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.

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Trout fishing on Otter Pond #2, Standish, Maine (November 11, 2012)

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General view of Otter Pond #2, with the railroad tracks in the background

Otter Pond #2 is located in Standish (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D1). This pond is one of four small ponds located right off Route 35 (Chadbourne Road).  Access to the pond is on foot from the two parking lots located on either side of the bridge over the old railroad tracks. The shortest way in is to walk about a quarter mile on the tracks until the pond appears on the right.  Joel and I instead take the long way in (> 0.5 mile), via the Mountain Division Trail which starts at the largest of the two parking lots. We are wheeling Joel’s canoe, and all our fishing gear, on this nice gravel road which passes next to Otter Pond #2. Our goal today is to troll for trout.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Little Watchic Pond, Standish, Maine (August 31, 2012)

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The rough boat launch on Little Watchic Pond

The rough boat launch on Little Watchic Pond

Little Watchic Pond is located in the town of Standish (see the Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 D5). Getting to the water is tricky because the surrounding area is crisscrossed by numerous dirt roads used by four-wheelers and snowmobilers. The best option is to turn onto Middle Road from Boundary Road and drive for 2.6 miles until reaching a gated crossroad. Check if the gate on the left is unlocked/open. If it is, then drive on that road until reaching the gravel pit after about 0.2 miles. Stay on the right of the pit and turn right on the second dirt road (the first one is currently blocked by large boulders). The pond is 0.2 miles further down. Stay right, then left, then right again at each of the splits on this dirt road. The launch by the pond is rough but can handle small trailered boats.

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