Pike fishing on Little Sabattus Pond, Greene, Maine (July 6, 2013)

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Entrance to Little Sabattus Pond

Entrance to Little Sabattus Pond

Little Sabattus Pond (also known as Hooper Pond) is a 25-acre body of water located in Greene, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 12 D1). The pond is part of the Hooper Pond Conservation Area, which is considered of state-wide importance due to the high quality of the surrounding natural habitat. This habitat, which consists of extensive wetlands and forested uplands, supports various species of wading birds, waterfowl, song birds, and amphibians.

 

 

 

 

 

The (flooded) boat launch on Little Sabattus Pond

The (flooded) boat launch on Little Sabattus Pond

Little Sabattus Pond is accessed via Hooper Pond Road. Ample parking is available. The boat launch is rough and cannot accommodate trailered boats. That may not be an issue since the fishing rules stipulate that motorboats are prohibited anyway (click here for more details). Otherwise, general fishing law applies.  This water body is also relatively shallow (maximum depth = 14 ft; mean depth = 8 ft). Click here for a depth map and more fisheries  information.

 

 

 

 

General view of Little Sabattus Pond

General view of Little Sabattus Pond

The outlet (called Hooper Brook) of Little Sabattus Pond flows for about 3-4 miles until it merges with Sabattus Pond. The latter is a well-known northern pike epicenter in the region. It appears that pike have worked their way upstream into Little Sabattus Pond and are now endemic to this body of water. A 2003 review of the fisheries in this pond by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife stated that “Northern pike, which most likely traveled up the outlet from Sabattus Pond, have only been present for a few years. Currently, bass and pickerel are providing a very good fishery, and undoubtedly northern pike will become more of an attraction at this small pond in the future”. Well, the future has arrived (see below)!

 

 

Looking down the shoreline on Little Sabattus Pond

Looking down the shoreline on Little Sabattus Pond

Little Sabattus Pond is completely undeveloped. No human interference is noticeable anywhere, except for the occasional car passing by along Hooper Pond Road. I arrive at 10 am; I’m completely by myself, which suits me just fine. The first thing that strikes me about the place is the beautiful and melodious chirping by a multitude of song birds in the surrounding woods and marshes. It’s clear that I entered a special area. I pick up several discarded soda cans and plastic cups left behind by careless visitors and launch my canoe. I love the layout of the pond. It is surrounded by broad-leafed lily pads. The individual leaves are spaced far enough from each other to easily swim a lure through them. The shoreline is also completely fringed by half-submerged berry bushes, which offer great hiding places for fish.

 

 

I caught three pike of this size in one hour and missed three more of similar size.

I caught three pike of this size in one hour and missed three more of similar size.

I start fishing with a black buzzbait which I augmented with a two-tailed white trailer. It’s a great “search lure” to quickly cover a lot of water. I also use a soft 5” stickbait to mix things up. I hook six pike and land three of them over the next hour. All these fish are relatively small (20”-22”) and appear rather skinny. Somewhat to my surprise, given the high quality of the habitat, I do not hook into any largemouth bass or pickerel. I’m suspecting that the invasive pike have done a great job thinning out these populations, thereby forever altering the fishery in this gorgeous pond!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The results: I caught three small northern pikes (20“- 22”) in one hour.

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

 

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2 thoughts on “Pike fishing on Little Sabattus Pond, Greene, Maine (July 6, 2013)

  1. Little Sabattus Pond looks like a great little water to go fishing on. The old saying that ‘pike thrive on neglect’ will almost certainly apply to this water. Given a few more years this will likely become a great pike fishery. Six hook-ups in an hour is pretty good fishing even if they are small fish. Many times a whole days fishing could go by with less than six hook-ups!

    Joe.

    • Yes, I agree with you that six pike hits in one hour is nothing to sneeze at. I also suspect that it must be a lot of fun to fish for pike on Little Sabattus Pond through the ice. I will definitely give that a shot next winter! Stan

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