Largemouth bass fishing on Proctor Pond in Albany Township, Maine (September 7, 2013)

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Access point to Proctor Pond

Access point to Proctor Pond

Proctor Pond is a 45-acre body of water located in Albany Township, Oxford County, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 10 D3). Public access is a challenge. It took me a good 45 minutes of driving all around the pond to find a way in. The reason is that much of the waterfront is privately owned, plus the pond is surrounded by a dense network of gravel roads, four wheeler roads, and snowmobile trails which seemingly go everywhere and nowhere. An easier way in may exist than the one explained below; if so, please feel free to share that information in the comment section at the end of this blog.

 

 

 

General view of Proctor Pond

General view of Proctor Pond

 

 

The access point to Proctor Pond can be reached by driving south on Route 5 and turning left onto Mountain Road located between Lynchville and East Stoneham. Stay on Mountain Road for 0.9 miles, passing the following landmarks (the mileage in parentheses represents cumulative miles starting from the Route 5 turn off: (a) Abbey Road on the right (0.1 mile), (b) Dam Field Road on the left (0.1 mile), (c) Haley Lane on the right (0.4 miles), (d) the rough bridge over the outlet (0.4 miles), (e) an ATV trail to the left (0.5 miles), (f) ATV trails branching off left and right, (g) stay right at the road split (0.8 miles), (h) look for a large trail signage board nailed to a big tree on the left side of the road (0.9 miles). The access road to the pond is across from that sign on the right. This forest trail is rough but drivable. The pond is located < 0.1 mile down this trail.  I did not see any “No Trespassing” signs on the trail and so assume that this is a legitimate way in. A public boat launch is not available. Only small hand-carried craft, such as a canoe or kayak, can be launched from this point.

 

Large areas along the shoreline of Proctor Pond are covered by water lilies

Large areas along the shoreline of Proctor Pond are covered by water lilies

Proctor Pond is pretty, quiet and peaceful. The rough launch is located on the western side of the pond and gives access to a large, shallow (< 2 ft deep) weedy expanse with a splendid view of French Hill in the background. The pond itself has a maximum depth of 15 ft and an average depth of 8 ft, which makes it relatively undeep. Abundant aquatic vegetation (particularly small water lilies which are a pain to fish through) surrounds the shoreline. The surface water is surprisingly clear given the amount of plants in the pond. The substrate is sandy with a layer of organic muck on top. About nine houses and seasonal camps surround the shoreline but they aren’t too visibly intrusive.   General fishing law applies. Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.

 

 

 

A nice largemouth bass from Proctor Pond

A nice largemouth bass from Proctor Pond

My 10-year old nephew Christian and I arrive at the access point on Proctor Pond around 11 am. I’m glad to finally have found a way in! The weather is beautiful this morning: mid 70’s, partly cloudy, and breezy. We’re the only ones on the water, which is always to my liking. Christian fishes with a 5” soft stickbait. I do too, but include a big black buzzbait to add some splash. We slowly paddle around the pond, fishing the edges and inside pockets of the aquatic vegetation. My first hit is a surprisingly-strong bite by a smallish but vigorous fish which falls for the buzzbait. No surprise, I’m tussling with a 14” smallmouth bass, which I had forgotten are in here too. How sweet! My second bite is on my stickbait and results in a feisty 16” largemouth bass. Poor Christian is sweating it out now: he’s gotten two bites but missed both fish. I’m slowly paddling back towards the access point in order to leave for our next pond. Christian quickly reels in his stickbait to recast one last time when we both notice a wake behind his lure, and two attempts at grabbing it. I tell him to slow down because a fish is going after his soft stickbait. Christian finally does so 6 ft from the canoe and hooks into a 14” largemouth, which might as well have been 22” because he is so excited and thrilled by the unexpected chase and the last-minute hook-up. Life is good!

 

The results: I caught one 14” smallmouth bass and a 16” largemouth bass in one hour; Christian caught a 14” largemouth bass.

 

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

 

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