Largemouth bass fishing on James Pond in Somerville, Maine (August 25, 2013)

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Access point to James Pond

Access point to James Pond

James Pond is a 54-acre body of water located in Somerville, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 13 C4). From the Augusta area, head east on Route 105 past Windsor and Somerville. Turn left on Turner Ridge Road and drive for about 1.2 miles until Colby Road appears to the left. Stay on Turner Road for another 0.3 miles and look for a rough but drivable forest road on the right. The access to the pond is about 300 ft down on the right by the fire pit.  I did not see any “No Trespassing” signs and so assume that this way in is legit.  Only small hand-carried craft, such as a canoe or kayak, can be launched from the access point. A public boat launch is not available.

 

 

 

General view of the western shoreline of James Pond

General view of the western shoreline of James Pond

 

 

James Pond is a little jewel safely tucked away in the northern-most corner of Lincoln County. Only two houses and a seasonal camp are visible from the water. The rest of the shoreline is completely wooded, except for a high-voltage line right-of-way and a wetland located on the southern end of the pond. The place has a nice remote feel to it. The pond has a maximum depth of 18 ft and a mean depth of 11 ft. The water is crystal clear and the substrate is made up of clean sand interspersed with many large submerged boulders.

 

 

Another view of the western shoreline on James Pond. Note the sparse largemouth bass habitat.

Another view of the western shoreline on James Pond. Note the sparse largemouth bass habitat.

The largemouth bass habitat on James Pond is sparse and consists mostly of patches of emergent pickerel weed along the shoreline and some lily pads by the southern wetland. I did not see much submerged wood. General fishing law applies on this pond, except that the maximum length on landlocked salmon and brown trout is 25”. James Pond is connected via its outlet to the nearby Sheepscot River. Both salmonid species are known to migrate up the outlet into the pond, but they are only transients which do not provide for a viable fishery. Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.

 

 

 

I reach James Pond at 6 pm. It’s another perfect late-summer day with temps in the low 70’s, no clouds, and a light southern breeze. The sun is starting to set behind the tree line. I’m immediately serenaded by a loon and its haunting call which wafts my way over the pond. I love that sounds which moves me deeply because it is primordial and untamed. I also realize that it is the very first time during my many trips to uncover “fabulous” largemouth bass ponds throughout Maine that I’ve encountered a loon. That’s not surprising since all of the ponds I visit with my canoe to write this series of blogs are relatively small whereas loons are “big-water” birds. I’m sure that the presence of the loon on this small pond says volumes about the high quality of its water.

 

This one fell for a soft stickbait

This one fell for a soft stickbait

I paddle towards the southern end of James Pond in order to let the breeze push me down the shoreline. I start fishing the edges of the pickerel weed stands using a 5” soft stickbait and a black buzzbait enhanced with a white two-tailed trailer. The fish are at their posts; I catch two 14” largemouth bass in 40 minutes. I suddenly get a call on my cell phone. It’s my wife reminding me of a family engagement I’m expected to attend this evening. Darn, I’m so engrossed in the moment that I completely forgot about it!! I immediately paddle back and call it a day.  But I am mighty pleased to have found this little pearl. I highly recommend it to anyone who wants to fish for largemouth bass alone and in quietness. This pond is a keeper and should be on your list of places to visit.

 

 

The results: I caught two 14”largemouth bass in 40 minutes of fishing.

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

 

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One thought on “Largemouth bass fishing on James Pond in Somerville, Maine (August 25, 2013)

  1. I’m glad you enjoyed your evening my mother and uncle own the camp that is located on this pond. I normally spend A LOT of time their during the summer and fish it several times in the winter. We were just out their all last weekend. My grandparents purchased the camp in 1952 for $500…would be pretty cheap for 4 acres these days…lol. My 4 year old son Gabe and I fished on this past Saturday and between camp and the south end year round house caught 4 nice largemouth. I normally like fishing on the other side from the outlet to the north end…more of a drop off over there and some good cover for them. If you like send me an email and I will forward you a few pictures of a few we have pulled out of there. It is a nice little jewel and I would love to keep fishing all to myself :-).

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