Largemouth bass fishing on Island Pond, Leeds, Maine (July 6, 2013)

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The entrance point to Island Pond on Route 106

The entrance point to Island Pond on Route 106

Island Pond is an 18-acre body of water located in Leeds, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 12 D1). To access this pond, drive north on Route 106 and cross the Plains Road/Blue Rock Road intersection. Continue for about 0.3 miles until you see a dirt road on the left barricaded with large cement blocks. A car can be parked on the shoulder of Route 106 next to the entrance. The pond is a 3 minute walk from this point. Go down the dirt road for about 300 ft. Continue straight (past a second set of cement blocks) on the trail when the dirt road turns to the right. Ignore the body of water on your right. Your target pond is 2 minutes down this path. The difficult access precludes all boats except for hand-carried craft, such as a canoe or kayak.

 

 

 

The access point on Island Pond

The access point on Island Pond

 

Island Pond has a maximum depth of 30 ft, and an average depth of 9 ft. The water is crystal clear. The substrate consists of clean sand interspersed with small gravel. The amount of aquatic vegetation along the shoreline is minimal and consists mainly of pipewort/quillwort which grow their skinny stems right through the water surface. The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife stated in a 2001 review of the pond’s fisheries that largemouth bass had reportedly been caught but this had not yet been confirmed. I can confirm that the pond is full of (stunted) largemouth bass (see below)! Click here for a depth map and more fisheries.

 

General view of Island Pond

General view of Island Pond

I reach Island Pond around noon. I fasten my canoe on my “canoe wheels” and efficiently roll all my equipment down to the pond. About half-a-dozen houses and cabins are located along the eastern shoreline right across from the launch area. The rest of the shoreline is covered by woods. The house owners are enjoying the warm but overcast weather by the water and are also blasting loud music. I love the Oldies, but not while fishing… I paddle towards the shallows on the right side of the launch area and start casting a big buzzbait to see what I can scare up. I catch my first largemouth bass within 5 minutes. Great! I keep on casting in that area and catch one more but miss several other ones.

 

 

 

A typical stunted largemouth bass caught on Island Pond

A typical stunted largemouth bass caught on Island Pond

Mmm, I notice that none of the bass have any size to them. I reach a drowned tree and use my 5” soft stickbait to probe the submerged branches. That effort yields four more small bass. Finally, I paddle across to check out another drowned three with my stickbait and catch several more bass. The bottom line is that this pond is loaded with largemouth bass but that the population appears to be quite stunted. All the fish caught this afternoon measure between 10” and 12”.

 

 

 

 

The results: I caught eight tiny largemouth bass (10“- 12”) in one hour.

 

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

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2 thoughts on “Largemouth bass fishing on Island Pond, Leeds, Maine (July 6, 2013)

  1. Spring, close to shore I was catching largemouth’s much bigger than 12″
    I have pics of prob 6 or so I caught and then of course released. You failed to mention if you catch and release? I hope so as it is and awesome spot! Happy Fishing 🙂

    • Thanks for sharing that you caught bigger largemouth bass in Island Pond than when I was up there in early July 2013. I’m glad to hear that’s the case because it definitely moves this pond even higher up on my list. I typically spend only one or two hours on each bass pond as I fish my way through Maine in the summer, so my snapshot may not necessarily reflect the full fishing potential of each body of water. That’s why insights such as yours are critical to get a fuller picture.

      As to your question: I’m a dedicated catch-and-release fisherman. I will confess to keeping an occasional brookie caught through the ice in the winter. I’ve got to keep the home-front happy too!

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