Largemouth bass fishing on Berry Pond, Wayne and Winthrop, Maine (September 7, 2015)

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The public access point is rather messy...

The public access point is rather messy…

Berry Pond is a 170-acre body of water located in the towns of Wayne and Winthrop, Maine (see the Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 12 C2). The public access point is found at the northern end of the pond, next to Route 133. Only hand-carried crafts can be released from this point. Beware that the launch itself is a muddy mess consisting of a wobbly gang plank and a couple of broken wooden pallets floating on the mud. These conditions may not be as bad in the spring and fall when the water levels are higher. The parking area is extensive and can accommodate many cars. The lack of a hard-top boat launch means that the pond is lightly fished. I also notice only a handful of pontoon boats on the water, indicating that motorized boat traffic is minimal. There’s one fly in this sweet ointment, though… The traffic on Route 133 is incessant. It generates intrusive road noise which impinges on the otherwise peaceful setting.

 

 

 

 

 

View of the marsh along the western shoreline of Berry Pond. This area contains emergent aquatic vegetation.

View of the marsh along the western shoreline of Berry Pond. This area contains emergent aquatic vegetation.

 

 

Berry Pond is a lightly-developed body of water supporting about a dozen houses. Most of them are strung along the eastern shoreline. The surrounding landscape is forested. The western half of the pond is completely undeveloped and supports a large marsh. The water is only very lightly stained. One obvious feature is the extensive shallow areas (< 3 ft) that surround the entire shore line. The substrate consists mostly of soft mud which is completely carpeted by submerged aquatic plants. The amount of aquatic vegetation on or above the water surface is surprisingly sparse given the shallowness of the lake and the abundance of aquatic plants. The one exception is found along the edges of the marsh. Also, this being the end of the summer, the shallows are infested with big unsightly blobs of green algae. The pond has a maximum and average depth of 25 ft and 14 ft, respectively. The water 15+ ft deep develops a severe oxygen deficiency in the summer. Click here for a depth map and additional fisheries information. Bass fishing falls under the general fishing rules which are available here.

 

A gorgeous view of Berry Pond looking north towards Route 133 in the far background

A gorgeous view of Berry Pond looking north towards Route 133 in the far background.

I arrive at Berry Pond at around 7:30 am. The sky is a deep azure blue and it is wind still. The air temperature is in the high 60’s and forecast to climb into the low 90’s. Two other guys by the parking area are getting ready to fish in their kayaks. I chat with them about their past successes on this pond. They report that it is not unusual for two people to catch a total of 20+ largemouths in a morning. That certainly sounds very encouraging!! I paddle straight across in order to fish in the shadow line that still persists along the eastern shoreline. I’d love to fish the edges of the marsh on the western half of the pond, but that requires a setting sun to create lower light conditions. I like fishing in the shadow line as long as possible because it keeps the largemouth bass in the shallows longer where they are easier to catch. I alternately fish with a loud buzzbait and a 5” pink soft stickbait.

 

 

 

 

This guy was hiding in the submerged roots of a cut tree. The soft stickbait did the trick.

This guy was hiding in the submerged roots of a cut tree. The soft stickbait did the trick.

I spend the first 30 minutes probing the shallows but fail to generate a single strike. I also do not see one rise. Mmm, that doesn’t sound good. A 12” largemouth bass finally grabs my spinnerbait and becomes my first catch of the day. At last! I entice my next bass out of a classic hiding place using my soft stickbait, i.e., the exposed submerged roots from a tree that was cut way back when the lake was impounded. This guy measures 16” and puts up a good fight. I catch my last bass of the morning when it announces itself with a loud swirl 30 ft in front of the canoe in about 2 ft of water. I immediately cast my soft stickbait right on top of the rise, but the lure is left untouched. I cast three more times in the general vicinity of the rise. On the last cast, I feel the bass swallow the lure and swim away with it. I just love that feeling! I set the hook and land a feisty 17” bass.

 

 

 

 

The results: I caught three largemouth bass (largest = 17”) in one hour of fishing.

 

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

 

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