Largemouth bass fishing on Beaver Pond, Westbrook, Maine (July 5, 2013)

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Access point to Beaver Pond

Access point to Beaver Pond

Beaver Pond is a 4-acre water body located in the heart of Westbrook (see the “Westbrook” map in The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 74 C1). The public access to this pond is located at the end of Church Street. Beware that it is weedy and unimproved. Only hand-carried craft, such as canoes or kayaks, can be launched from this point. Parking is on the street.

 

 

 

 

 

A view of the shoreline of Beaver Pond.

A view of the shoreline of Beaver Pond.

The State stocks Beaver Pond very nicely each early April with 50 brook trout per acre. These trout measure about 10” and should offer fast action in the spring. It’s unclear if any of these fish survive the summer to be caught through the ice later on in the year. The surface of the water was “bathtub” warm on July 5 and I don’t know if the pond is deep enough to offer a cold-water refugium on the bottom.

 

Another view of the shoreline of Beaver Pond (note the color of the water)

Another view of the shoreline of Beaver Pond (note the color of the water)

I arrive at Beaver Pond at 6 pm. It is hot and muggy and wind still. I quickly unload my canoe and am fishing ten minutes later. On the positive side of the ledger, the pond sits in surprisingly pretty surroundings given its location in the center of town.  Less than a dozen homes are clearly visible from the water. Most of the shoreline is heavily wooded and shaded. Patches of lily pads grow in various locations. Overall, the pond appears to provide great largemouth bass habitat. But there is a huge negative side: the water looks like mud soup! I can’t see my hand when I submerge it 6” deep. The surface of the water is also covered with floating patches of mossy slime. The water doesn’t smell bad but has a terrible look to it which totally takes away from the experience.

 

 

The trees along the shoreline hide the houses in the background

The trees along the shoreline hide the houses in the background

I start fishing with a big buzzbait, a 5” floating Rappalla, and a 5” soft stickbaits. I focus on the buzzbait because I’m not sure that any fish would be able to locate a lure that doesn’t make a whole lot of flash and splash in this opaque water. There’s something else missing on the pond but I just can’t put my finger on it… I hit the available structure all along the shoreline but don’t elicit a single strike. Some of that habitat represents prime largemouth bass real estate, but no one appears to be home. What’s missing in this picture? I slowly paddle along the northern shoreline, getting more and more turned off by the terrible look of the water, when it suddenly hits me! No aquatic bugs are present on or over the water and, most revealingly, I haven’t seen a single dragon fly over the last hour!! The water quality of Beaver Pond is so degraded that aquatic insects don’t seem to be able to make a living in it. I immediately turn around and leave, with a promise never to come back…

 

The results: skunked!

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

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One thought on “Largemouth bass fishing on Beaver Pond, Westbrook, Maine (July 5, 2013)

  1. I have lived on Beaver Pond for over 30 years and know it like my back yard. Sorry you didn’t catch your largemouth. It used to be stocked yearly with trout, but I don’t think at present. You came at the deadest time of year. There is plenty of wildlife in and on the pond: pickerel, hornpout, turtles, great blue heron, night heron, mallard, kingfisher, common duck, the occasional osprey and eagle. Also catfish.
    Find a bigger pond.

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