Fly fishing for trout on Dixon Pond, Pierce Pond Township, Maine (May 25, 2014)

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The flank of Pierce Pond Mountain plunges into Dixon Pond

The flank of Pierce Pond Mountain plunges into Dixon Pond

Dixon Pond is a completely undeveloped 17-acre pond located within the protected Pierce Pond watershed in Somerset County, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 30 A1). This water body has an average depth of 26 ft and a maximum depth of 55 ft, which is remarkably deep given the relatively small size of the pond. The main reason is that it abuts the flank of Pierce Pond Mountain which plunges into the southwestern end of the pond. Access is via a rough foot trail which roughly parallels the pond’s outlet. The trail starts at the Caribou Narrows, which is one of the two thoroughfares that link Lower to Middle Pierce Pond. It takes about 25 minutes of easy hiking through the woods to reach Dixon.  Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.

 

 

 

 

 

The shoreline of Dixon Pond is completely forested.

The shoreline of Dixon Pond is completely forested.

 

 

The fishing rules for Dixon Pond are strict, as follows: (a) the pond is closed to ice fishing and is open to fishing from May 1 to September 30; (b) fly fishing only, and (c) the daily bag limit on trout is two fish with a minimum length of 10”, only one of which may exceed 12”.  Click here for more details on the regulations. The State does not stock this water body. The native brook trout population is abundant but stunted. The average brookie measures between 6” and 12”. None of the many dozen trout I’ve caught in Dixon Pond over the years have ever exceeded 13”.  In my humble opinion, the bag limit should be increased to five fish and the size limit decreased to 6” in order to help thin out the overabundant population and allow more brook trout to grow bigger.

 

Bill working one of his fish back to the canoe

Bill working one of his fish back to the canoe

I love going to Dixon Pond, not because the brook trout have any size to them, but because the pond is isolated, gorgeous, fun to hike into, and a blast to dry fly. Bill and I are staying with Joel and Salvi at Cobb’s Camp on Lower Pierce Pond for the long Memorial Day weekend. The two of us want to hike up to Dixon and fish it for a couple of hours in the morning. We reach the pond at around 10 am. The sky is mostly overcast but the water is only stirred by a gentle breeze. Unfortunately, we see no hatches or rises upon our arrival. That’s been the general story of the entire fishing trip this year and is the result of the late ice out (May 9) on Pierce Pond. Mother Nature is running 7 to 10 days behind schedule, and it shows. On the other hand, we are not being carried off by blackflies either! Note that the only way to fly fish Dixon Pond is from a small craft. We picked up the keys at Cobb’s Camp to unlock the camp’s two canoes which are stored on shore.

 

 

 

This native brookie fell for a brown woolly bugger

This native brookie fell for a brown woolly bugger

We each take a canoe and paddle across to fish where Pierce Pond Mountain plunges into Dixon Pond. The trees along that shoreline lean sharply over the water or have fallen into it, creating a lot of shadow and structural habitat. We don’t bother dry flying due to the lack of hatching and instead tie up woolly buggers in dark green, brown, and black colors on our sinking tip lines. We both have a blast fishing the tree line at this spot, and elsewhere around the pond, over the next 2.5 hours. The goal is to place the woolly buggers close to the trees, let it sink for a few seconds, and then gently bring it back towards the canoe, all the while endeavoring not to get stuck on sunken branches. That strategy yields six trout for Bill and three for me. As usual, all the fish are between about 6” and 12” long. We both also missed another half a dozen fish which wiggled off the hook before we were able to land them. Overall, the fishing was good and the trout were active and willing to bite.

 

 

 

Was the information in this blog useful? I invite you to share your thoughts and opinions. Also, feel free to discuss your fishing experiences at this location.

 

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