Brook trout fishing on Panther Run in Raymond, Maine (April 21, 2016)

 

We launch the canoe in the large pool across from the retaining wall

We launch the canoe in the large pool across from the retaining wall

Panther Run (a.k.a. Jordan River) is formed by the outlet of Panther Pond in Raymond, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 C2). The river starts at the dam on Mill Street and flows for one or so convoluted mile towards Jordan Bay in Sebago Lake. The big pool along the retaining wall by the dam is an accessible and popular brook trout fishing hole (click here for details). The river in the immediate vicinity of the dam flows briskly in early spring and has a substrate consisting of coarse sand, gravel and cobbles. In fact, the water flow and substrate composition are such that landlocked Atlantic salmon migrate up from Sebago Lake every fall to lay their eggs in this stretch of the river. But don’t be fooled… The character of the river changes dramatically no more than about 1000 ft downstream of the dam: the current slows down considerably, the banks widen up and become severely eroded, the water deepens in many places, and the substrate is made up entirely of fine white sand. The bottom is also carpeted with branches and other woody debris.

 

 

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Trout fishing on the Pleasant River, Windham, Maine (October 17, 2015)

A quiet morning fishing for trout on the Pleasant River while leaf peeing. What a combination!

A quiet fall morning trout fishing on the Pleasant River while leaf peeping… How better does life get??

The Pleasant River is a major tributary of the Presumpscot River. It originates in Gray and flows in a south-westerly direction to its confluence with the Presumpscot located at a spot a few miles downstream of Dundee Pond in Windham.  A favorite stretch of the Pleasant River flows from Route 302 by Foster Corner to Pope Road, located about 1.5 miles further downstream (see the Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D2 and D3). This is the stretch I am exploring this morning with Christian, my 12-year old nephew. He’s excited about this trip because he has never used waders before and it will also be his first time fishing for trout using spinners, instead of worms and bobbers. I’m lending him one of my spare waders. We get a good laugh during the pre-fishing fitting session at home when we realize that the top of the waders hit his chin! He looks like an oversized gnome with hanging skin but he takes it all in good strides.

 

 

 

 

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Brook trout fishing on the Northwest River, Sebago, Maine (May 21, 2015)

View of the Northwest River upstream of Fitch Road. Notice the lack of holding pools

View of the Northwest River upstream of Fitch Road. Notice the lack of holding pools

The Northwest River is a short stream which starts as the outlet of Peabody Pond in the town of Sebago and flows for about five river miles until it reaches the western shore of Sebago Lake, also in the town of Sebago (see the Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 B4 C4 C5). It picks up water not only from the overflow of Peabody Pond itself, but also from several small named (e.g., Hill Brook and Mill Brook) and unnamed tributaries along the way. The State stocks this body of water several times each spring with between 400 and 500 8” to 10” brook trout (click here for more details). I’m spending some time this morning exploring the lower 1.5 miles of the Northwest River to assess its potential as a trout fishery.

 

 

 

 

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Trout fishing on the Kennebunk River in Kennebunk, Maine (May 10, 2014)

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The Kennebunk River upstream of the Route 1 bridge provides great trout habitat

The Kennebunk River upstream of the Route 1 bridge provides great trout habitat

The Kennebunk River has it source in the area of Waterboro, Maine. It flows in a generally southeasterly direction through Kennebunk before emptying out in the Atlantic Ocean in Kennebunkport. Every spring, the State stocks this river three or four times in April and May with (give or take) around 2,000 brook trout and brown trout measuring between 8” and 10”. General fishing rules apply on this body of water. Click here for more details on the regulations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Trout fishing on Pierce Pond Stream in Carrying Place Township, Maine (May 26, 2014)

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One of the many spectacular water falls on Pierce Pond Stream

One of the many spectacular water falls on Pierce Pond Stream

Pierce Pond Stream flows for about 3.5 miles between Pierce Pond and the Kennebec River (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 30 B2). We explore this stream during our annual Memorial Day weekend fishing trip on Pierce Pond. We motor over from Cobb’s Camp and tie up at the Harrison Camp landing at the dam by the outlet. We find the Appalachian Trail (AT) which runs parallel to the stream and explore this natural beauty for about 1 mile downstream from the dam. Google Maps shows that Otter Pond Road provides direct driving access to the stream (note that The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer calls it Bowtown Road). This road, as viewed from the bridge over the stream, looks like a well-maintained gravel road.

 

 

 

 

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Trout fishing on Willett Brook in Bridgeton, Maine (May 18, 2014)

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good stretch #6 (publish)This is a tale of two brooks…Willett Brook has its source in Denmark, ME. It flows north towards Bridgton and empties out into Long Lake. The State stocks this stream once each spring in late April-early May with around 400 brown trout measuring between 8” and 10”. General fishing rules apply. Click here for more details on the regulations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Trout fishing on the Merriland River, Wells, Maine (May 5, 2014)

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A lazy pool on the Merriland River above the Collins Road culvert

A lazy pool on the Merriland River above the Collins Road culvert

The Merriland River has its source in Sanford, ME. It flows through the towns of Wells and Kennebunk and into the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge before emptying out in the Atlantic Ocean. Every year, the State stocks this river two or three times in April and May with (give or take) around 2,000 brook trout and brown trout measuring about 10”.  Click here for the latest stocking data. I’m spending two hours this evening exploring that part of the Merriland River which flows for about 2 miles between Route 1 and Interstate 95 in Kennebunk. I drive up Coles Hill Road from Route 1 for exactly 1 mile and arrive at a large culvert through which flows the river. I’m not the only one here this evening: five other cars are parked along the shoulder. The weather is grey and overcast. The air temp is 56°F and the water comes in at 54°F. The water level also looks perfect. Note that this stretch is governed by special fishing rules, as follows: (a) the river is open to fishing between April 1 and October 31, (b) only artificial lures are allowed, and (c) the daily bag limit for trout is two fish. Click here for more details about the fishing rules. 

 

 

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Brook trout fishing on Panther Run, Raymond, Maine (April 28, 2014)

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View of Panther Run from the dam

View of Panther Run from the dam

Panther Run (a.k.a. the Jordan River) is the outlet of Panther Pond. It starts at the Panther Pond dam by Mill Street and runs for roughly 1.5 river miles until it flows underneath Route 302 into Sebago Lake in Raymond. In early spring, melt water from the Crescent Lake and Panther Pond watersheds pours out into Panther Run via a long shute in the dam. This action creates a raging, roiling pool at the foot of the dam which attracts lots of brook trout. Note that the State stocks Panther Run each spring with several hundred brookies once in April and twice in May. Click here for the latest fish stocking data.

 

 

 

 

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Brook trout fishing in Acadia National Park, Maine

Acadia National Park is a major jewel in the National Park Service crown. It is located on Mount Desert Island along the rugged coast of Downeast Maine in Hancock County. Many hundreds of thousands of people visit the park each year to enjoy the great outdoors, including sea kayaking, biking the carriage trails, exploring the many hiking trails in the Park, watching the sun rise from the top of Mount Cadillac, or enjoying the stunning views of the Atlantic Ocean from the Park Loop Road. Too few, however, take advantage of the fabulous brook trout fishing on the numerous secluded ponds which are tucked away throughout the Park.

This blog focuses specifically on those small ponds less than 50 acres in size which are stocked with brook trout by the State every year.  Nine ponds within the boundary of the Park fall within this category.  Keep in mind that several streams that flow through the Park are also home to native brookies. These fish are typically small in size, but can be plentiful, aggressive, and quite feisty, particularly in spring and early summer. They are also typically easier to catch than the larger stocked trout. In addition, no boat is required since all the stream fishing takes place from shore! Examples of streams that support native brook trout in Acadia National Park include Richardson Brook (outlet of Betty Aunt Pond; see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 16 B3), Jordan Stream (outlet of Jordan Pond; see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 16 C3), Hunters Brook (outlet of Bubble Pond; see Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 16 C4), Stanley Brook (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 16 C4), and Little Harbor Brook (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 16 C3).  

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Trout fishing on the Nezinscott River, Turner, Maine (October 26, 2013)


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View of the Nezinscott River

View of the Nezinscott River

The Nezinscott River has it sources in Woodstock (West Branch) and Sumner (East Branch). The two branches merge in Bucksfield, from where the river flows eastwards past Turner and Turner Center into the Androscoggin River. It has a total length of 25 to 30 miles (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 11).  The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife stocks the portion of the Nezinscott River in the Turner area between April and May with about 2,500-3,000 9”-10” trout (mostly brown trout) each spring, and then spices things up in October with another 200 or so larger brown trout (click here for more details).

 

 

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