Trout fishing on Otter Pond #2, Standish, Maine (November 10, 2013)

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General view of Otter Pond #2

General view of Otter Pond #2

Otter Pond #2 is a 12-acre body of water located in Standish, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D1; note that on the Google map above, Otter Pond #2 is the pond just below the one indicated by the red pin). Read this blog for directions on how to access this pond. Otter Pond #2 is a widely popular spot for early ice fishing, but gets little or no pressure in the fall after it is stocked for the winter season.  My son Joel and I arrive at the largest of the two parking lots off Route 35 by 8:15 am. As expected, we’re all by ourselves, which suits us just fine. We place his canoe on canoe wheels, load up the car battery, electric trolling engine, and our fishing gear in the boat, and haul everything down the Mountain Division Trail to our destination. I checked the stocking report on-line the day before; the State released a truckload of brookies in this pond last week which should make for good fishing.

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Trout fishing on the Nezinscott River, Turner, Maine (October 26, 2013)


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View of the Nezinscott River

View of the Nezinscott River

The Nezinscott River has it sources in Woodstock (West Branch) and Sumner (East Branch). The two branches merge in Bucksfield, from where the river flows eastwards past Turner and Turner Center into the Androscoggin River. It has a total length of 25 to 30 miles (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 11).  The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife stocks the portion of the Nezinscott River in the Turner area between April and May with about 2,500-3,000 9”-10” trout (mostly brown trout) each spring, and then spices things up in October with another 200 or so larger brown trout (click here for more details).

 

 

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Trout fishing on a private pond in Grey, Maine (October 20, 2013)

My friend John recently moved from the city to the country side where he bought a beautiful house in the woods. The previous owner dammed up a small spring-fed streamlet and dug a 12-ft deep hole to create a small pond in the backyard. He also stocked that pond with four dozen 8” rainbow trout and a handful of 5 lbs. spawners! John, who knows my passion for fishing, invites me over to try to catch one of those monsters. I readily accept after some light arm twisting : ) He does request that I make sure to remove the barbs from the hooks of my lures because he doesn’t want to injure the smaller rainbows in his pond.

 

I show up in his back yard at 8 am with my 10-year old nephew Christian, who is just as excited as I am about the possibility of catching the fish of a lifetime. I’ll fish with #2 Mepps spinners on an ultra-light rod with a reel containing 6-pound test line, a Woolly Bugger on a fly rod with sinking line, and a 4” plastic swim bait on a heavier rod and reel. Christian will fish with a bobber and live worms. We see surface activity as we quietly approach the pond upon arrival: the fish are picking at stuff in the water film, and one of them is huge!! I implore Christian to crouch down and to walk softly so as not to scare the fish. I start casting my Mepps but without generating any interest. Christian, on the other hand, gets several bites in the first 30 minutes but is either too distracted or not putting enough tension on the line to set the hook quickly enough.

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Rainbow trout fishing on the La Vis River in southern France (July 18, 2013)


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View of La Vis River upstream of Ganges in southern France

View of La Vis River upstream of Ganges in southern France

I’m spending a family vacation in the region of Ganges (a town located about 44 miles west of the city of Nîmes) in southern France in mid-July of 2013. I start a conversation with the hotelier with whom we’re staying, and of course inevitably end up talking about fishing… He mentions that the river La Vis, which flows into the river Hérault just upstream of Ganges is recognized as the premier trout fishing river in the whole of France (well, he claimed the whole of Europe but I took that with a large grain of salt)! Regardless, information like that fully captures my attention and I decide to give La Vis a shot.

 

 

 

 

 

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Trout fishing on Ell Pond, Sanford, Maine (May 19, 2013)

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General view of Ell Pond

General view of Ell Pond

Ell Pond (a.k.a. Little Pond) covers 32 acres and is located on the townline between Wells and Sanford (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 2 D4).  Drive on Horace Mill Road and turn off on Ell Pond Road. Hang a right and the unimproved boat launch will appear at the end of the road. This small water body is surprisingly deep (maximum depth of 51 ft) and crystal clear. The substrate consists of rough sand, gravel, and cobble. Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information

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Trout fishing on Alden’s Pond, Gorham, Maine (May 18, 2013)


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General view of Alden's Pond

General view of Alden’s Pond

Alden’s Pond is a 1-acre, kids-only fishing  pond located behind the Gorham campus of the University of Southern Maine (USM) (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 E2). To reach the pond, look for the USM police department office on Husky Drive (across from the John Mitchell Center), walk behind the office and down the steep dirt path, and pass the small retaining pond across from the soccer field. Your target will be visible on the left through the trees.  The pond is fishable under Special Regulation Code S-9, i.e., open to fishing only to kids under 16-years old, restricted to two lines per person, and a daily bag limit of two trout. Click here and here for more details on the fishing regulations pertaining to this pond.  Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.

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Trout fishing on the Presumpscot River, Westbrook, Maine (May 18, 2013)

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View of the falls on the Presumpscot River from Bridge Street in downtown Westbrook

View of the falls on the Presumpscot River from Bridge Street in downtown Westbrook

The Presumpscot River is the outlet of Sebago Lake. It flows for about 25 winding miles through the towns of Standish, Windham, Gorham, Westbrook, Falmouth, and Portland before emptying out in Casco Bay. The river drops an impressive 270 feet between Sebago Lake and the ocean through a series of falls. Many of these falls lay submerged behind the dams that dot the river. However, one of those falls, located in Westbrook, is easily accessible and makes for a great fishing site. That’s where I’m heading this morning with my 10-year old nephew Christian, who has developed into an eager fisherman this year.  The Saccarappa Falls are located just upstream of Bridge Street, off Maine Street in downtown Westbrook. Ample parking is available across from a small municipal park. We walk towards the river, squeeze through a railing, and scamper down the rocks towards the water.

 

 

 

 

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Trout fishing on Wilcox Pond, Biddeford, Maine (May 12, 2013)

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View of Christian fishing from the retaining wall on Wilcox Pond

Christian is trying his luck fishing from the retaining wall on Wilcox Pond

Wilcox Pond is a 3-acre pond located next to Saint Joseph’s Cemetery on West Street in Biddeford, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 3 C2). This body of water is set aside as a “kids only” fishing pond.  It is fishable under Special Regulation Code S-9, i.e., open to fishing only to kids under the age of 16, restricted to two lines per person, and a daily bag limit of two trout. Click here and here for more details on this topic. Every year, the state stocks it two or three times between early April and mid May with a total of between 300 and 400 10” brook trout. Do the math: this small body of water is loaded with brookies, which makes for an exciting fishing spot for young budding anglers! There is also the potential for catching larger hold-over trout because even though the pond is shallow (maximum depth = 6 ft), the bottom remains cool throughout the summer due to input from two cold-water inlets. Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.

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Trout fishing on Little River in Gorham, Maine (May 11, 2013)


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View if the Little River looking upstream from underneath the Route 237 bridge

View of the Little River looking upstream from underneath the Route 237 bridge

The Little River has its sources in Standish and Buxton and merges with the Presumpscot River downstream from Route 237 at the Gorham/Windham town line (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 E2). Every year, the state stocks the main stem of this river several times between early April and mid May with a total of around 2,300 brown trout and brook trout measuring 9” to 10”. Click here for stocking details .

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Trout fishing on Collyer Brook in Gray, Maine (May 11, 2013)


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Collyer Brook

Collyer Brook

Colleyer Brook runs roughly between North Gray and its confluence with the Royal River in East Gray (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 C4). Every year, the state stocks this stream several times between early April and early May with a total of about 2,000 brown trout and brook trout measuring around 10”. Click here for stocking details are available at .  I’m spending a couple of hours this afternoon exploring that part of Collyer Brook which flows upstream from Merrill Road (off Mayall Road) in Gray.  I arrive at the bridge at around 2:30 pm and park on the sandy shoulder. There’s enough space to park a half-dozen cars. I talk to two guys who are getting out of their waders. They tell me that they fished the stretch upstream of the bridge and that they caught one 14” brown trout in 3 hours.

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