Largemouth bass fishing on Moose Pond in Bridgeton, Maine (July 19, 2014)

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View of the shoreline in the Upper Basin

View of the shoreline in the Upper Basin

Moose Pond is a 1,694-acre body of water which straddles the towns of Denmark and Sweden in Oxford County, and Bridgeton in Cumberland County (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer Map 4 A&B3). An excellent hard-top boat launch is located on Route 302 on the eastern end of the causeway. A second hard-top boat launch (which I did not visit) is located at the southern end of the lake off Denmark Road in Denmark, less than a mile north of Route 160 (a.k.a. West Main Street; see the Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 B3). I also noticed what appears to be a dirt launch for canoes and kayaks facing the Upper Basin on the wooded island which links to Route 302 about halfway down the causeway.  Moose Pond is a highly-popular regional destination for both open-water fishing in the spring, summer, and fall and for ice fishing in the winter. It consistently yields serious lake trout and landlocked salmon every year, particularly through the ice, but also during spring trolling. The largemouth and smallmouth bass populations are robust enough to support tournament fishing.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Webster’s Mill Pond, Limington, Maine (July 12, 2014)

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The sandy boat launch of Webster's Mill Pond could accommodate small trailered boats

The sandy boat launch of Webster’s Mill Pond can accommodate small trailered boats

Webster’s Mill Pond (also known as North Limington Pond) is a 40-acre body of water located in Limington, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 D4). The pond, which sits at the intersection of Route 11 (Sokokis Avenue) and Route 25 (Ossipee Trail), is easily reached from Route 11. An unimproved sandy boat launch allows access to small trailered boats. The section of the pond along Route 11 is a popular spot to fish from shore. However, the most productive approach by far is to fish from a small craft.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Smallmouth bass fishing on Dundee Pond, Windham, Maine (July 12, 2014)

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General view if Dundee Pond: calm, serene, and all to ourselves!

General view if Dundee Pond: calm, serene, and all to ourselves!

Dundee Pond is a 197-acre body of water located in Windham and Gorham, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D2). A public launch is located off Windham Center Road right below the North Gorham Pond Dam in Windham. This access point has parking for about eight cars but can only accommodate hand-carried craft. The stretch of water between the launch and the pond itself consists of about a quarter mile of the Presumpscot River. The current is steady and relatively strong which requires kayakers and canoeists to paddle their way back up after they’re done fishing on the pond. An alternative approach, which bypasses this flowing water altogether, is to launch an hand-carried craft from the sandy beach at Dundee Park located at the end of Dundee Road off River Road in Windham. The park is open from 8 am until sunset but charges an entry fee of $4 per adult (12 years and older) and $2 per child (2 to12 years). Click here for more information. I also attempted to access the pond at the Dundee Pond dam located at the end of Dundee Road (off Hurricane Road in Gorham) but turned around when I noticed that the road was posted as “no trespassing”.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Alewife Pond, Kennebunk, Maine (June 29, 2014)

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The entrance marker on Cole Road to the Alewife Woods Preserve

The entrance marker on Cole Road to the Alewife Woods Preserve

Alewife Pond is a 37-acre body of water located in Kennebunk, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 2 C5). The pond is accessible by driving north on Cole Road from Alfred Road for about 0.6 miles, and turning right on the Alewife Woods Preserve (look for the sign on the right of the road). Leave your car at the small parking lot about 300 ft in. The 625-acre Preserve is owned and managed by the Kennebunk Land Trust. The Preserve is well worth a visit for its quiet, wooded and isolated setting within a short drive of several popular nearby coastal resorts. It has 2.5 miles of easy trails to support outdoors activities in the summer (e.g., walking, bird watching, dirt biking) and winter (e.g., snow shoeing and cross-country skiing). Fires, motorized vehicles, and camping are not allowed. Click here for more information on the Preserve.

 

 

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Otter Pond, Bridgton, Maine (June 14, 2014)

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General view of Otter Pond from the launch area

General view of Otter Pond from the launch area

Otter Pond is a 90-acre body of water located in Bridgton, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 A4). To access the pond, turn right on Otter Pond Road after driving about 4 miles north on Route 302 from Naples. The pond will appear on your left after about 0.2 miles. Note that this “road” is quite rough and eroded, with rocks and small boulders sticking out left and right. I’m able to get through with my front-wheel drive car, but only slowly and very carefully… This pond provides a real sense of isolation and remoteness, which is remarkable considering that it is located but a few of miles outside of both Naples and Bridgton. Only two or three houses are visible from the water. The surrounding landscape is completely forested, with Mount Henry keeping watch in the background.

 

 

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Burnt Meadow Pond, Brownfield, Maine (June 14, 2014)

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View of the town beach area on Burnt Meadow Pond

View of the town beach area on Burnt Meadow Pond

Burnt Meadow Pond is a 69-acre body of water located in Brownfield, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 B2). The easiest access is via the excellent boat launch located off Route 160 (Spring Street) which runs parallel to the shoreline along the western side of the pond. An alternative access point, but only for small hand-carried craft, is from the town beach off Burnt Meadow Road (follow the blue signs for “town beach”) located by the outlet at the northern end of the pond. About two-dozen houses dot the shoreline, mostly along the northern shore. The setting is actually quite pleasing with Burnt Meadow Mountain looming in the background. The surrounding watershed is completely forested.

 

 

 

 

 

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Trout and salmon fishing on Pierce Pond, Pierce Pond Township, Maine (May 24 to 27, 2014)

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Cobb's Camp, our headquarters for the next four days

Cobb’s Camp, our headquarters for the next four days

This blog continues the story started here. Salvi and Bill arrive at Cobb’s Camp on Lower Pierce Pond on Saturday morning at 11:30 am for our annual, 4-day fly fishing extravaganza. We all love staying at Cobb’s this time of year to take advantage of the may fly hatches which typically peak on this lake during the long Memorial Day weekend. We move in our own log cabin featuring a warm bed, a wood stove, electric power, running water, a hot shower, and a toilet. Not bad for a near-wilderness setting far off in the Maine woods! Our hosts also serve us three square meals, which includes a bagged lunch to take with us on the water.

 

 

 

 

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Fly fishing for trout on Dixon Pond, Pierce Pond Township, Maine (May 25, 2014)

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The flank of Pierce Pond Mountain plunges into Dixon Pond

The flank of Pierce Pond Mountain plunges into Dixon Pond

Dixon Pond is a completely undeveloped 17-acre pond located within the protected Pierce Pond watershed in Somerset County, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 30 A1). This water body has an average depth of 26 ft and a maximum depth of 55 ft, which is remarkably deep given the relatively small size of the pond. The main reason is that it abuts the flank of Pierce Pond Mountain which plunges into the southwestern end of the pond. Access is via a rough foot trail which roughly parallels the pond’s outlet. The trail starts at the Caribou Narrows, which is one of the two thoroughfares that link Lower to Middle Pierce Pond. It takes about 25 minutes of easy hiking through the woods to reach Dixon.  Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.

 

 

 

 

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Fly fishing for trout on Split Rock Pond, Pierce Pond Township, Maine (May 26, 2014)

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The team strategizing before paddling onto Split Rock Pond...

The team strategizing before paddling onto Split Rock Pond…

Split Rock Pond is a completely undeveloped 6-acre pond nestled on the lower flank of Otter Pond Mountain within the Pierce Pond watershed (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 30 A2). This shallow water body has an average depth of 5 ft and a maximum depth of 15 ft. The bottom consists mostly of soft organic muck and the water is slightly colored. Access to this pond is via unmarked foot trails through the woods. Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information. The fishing rules are strict, as follows: (a) the pond is closed to ice fishing and is open to fishing from May 1 to September 30; (b) fly fishing only, and (c) the daily bag limit on trout is two fish with a minimum length of 10”, only one of which may exceed 12”.  Click here for more details on the regulations.

 

 

 

 

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Trout and salmon fishing on Pierce Pond, Pierce Pond Township, Maine (May 22 to 24, 2014)

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Upper Pierce Pond all to myself during my early-morning troll

Upper Pierce Pond is all mine during my early-morning troll

Pierce Pond is a gem of a lake nestled in the mountains of central Somerset County (see the Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 30 A2). It consists of three basins (lower, middle and upper) connected by shallow, boulder-infested thoroughfares. The water is crystal clear and its quality is superb. This water body, which covers 1,650 acres, is completely surrounded by a protected forested watershed. Hence, civilization intrudes minimally, except for a few grand-fathered camps in Lindsay Cove. The entire shoreline is deeply wooded and not a single dock or house is visible anywhere, except for Cobb’s Camp.  Click here for a depth map and more fisheries information.

 

 

 

 

 

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