Largemouth bass fishing on Mud Pond in Greenwood, Maine (September 14, 2013)

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View of Mud Pond from the rough boat launch

View of Mud Pond from the rough boat launch

Mud Pond is a 52-acre body of water located in Greenwood, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 10 C5). Drive north on Greenwood Road towards the town of Greenwood. The pond will appear to the left side, right next to the road. The unimproved access point is located through a copse of trees. Parking is on a small grassy area alongside the road. Only small hand-carried craft, such as a canoe or kayak, can be launched from this point. A public boat launch is not available.

 

 

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Trout fishing on Otter Pond #2, Standish, Maine (November 10, 2013)

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General view of Otter Pond #2

General view of Otter Pond #2

Otter Pond #2 is a 12-acre body of water located in Standish, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D1; note that on the Google map above, Otter Pond #2 is the pond just below the one indicated by the red pin). Read this blog for directions on how to access this pond. Otter Pond #2 is a widely popular spot for early ice fishing, but gets little or no pressure in the fall after it is stocked for the winter season.  My son Joel and I arrive at the largest of the two parking lots off Route 35 by 8:15 am. As expected, we’re all by ourselves, which suits us just fine. We place his canoe on canoe wheels, load up the car battery, electric trolling engine, and our fishing gear in the boat, and haul everything down the Mountain Division Trail to our destination. I checked the stocking report on-line the day before; the State released a truckload of brookies in this pond last week which should make for good fishing.

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Trout fishing on the Nezinscott River, Turner, Maine (October 26, 2013)


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View of the Nezinscott River

View of the Nezinscott River

The Nezinscott River has it sources in Woodstock (West Branch) and Sumner (East Branch). The two branches merge in Bucksfield, from where the river flows eastwards past Turner and Turner Center into the Androscoggin River. It has a total length of 25 to 30 miles (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 11).  The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife stocks the portion of the Nezinscott River in the Turner area between April and May with about 2,500-3,000 9”-10” trout (mostly brown trout) each spring, and then spices things up in October with another 200 or so larger brown trout (click here for more details).

 

 

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Trout fishing on a private pond in Grey, Maine (October 20, 2013)

My friend John recently moved from the city to the country side where he bought a beautiful house in the woods. The previous owner dammed up a small spring-fed streamlet and dug a 12-ft deep hole to create a small pond in the backyard. He also stocked that pond with four dozen 8” rainbow trout and a handful of 5 lbs. spawners! John, who knows my passion for fishing, invites me over to try to catch one of those monsters. I readily accept after some light arm twisting : ) He does request that I make sure to remove the barbs from the hooks of my lures because he doesn’t want to injure the smaller rainbows in his pond.

 

I show up in his back yard at 8 am with my 10-year old nephew Christian, who is just as excited as I am about the possibility of catching the fish of a lifetime. I’ll fish with #2 Mepps spinners on an ultra-light rod with a reel containing 6-pound test line, a Woolly Bugger on a fly rod with sinking line, and a 4” plastic swim bait on a heavier rod and reel. Christian will fish with a bobber and live worms. We see surface activity as we quietly approach the pond upon arrival: the fish are picking at stuff in the water film, and one of them is huge!! I implore Christian to crouch down and to walk softly so as not to scare the fish. I start casting my Mepps but without generating any interest. Christian, on the other hand, gets several bites in the first 30 minutes but is either too distracted or not putting enough tension on the line to set the hook quickly enough.

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Eight fabulous largemouth bass ponds in south coastal Maine (Androscoggin, Sagadahoc, and Lincoln Counties)

Fishing for largemouth bass is a cherished summer activity for many fishermen in southern Maine. The desired quietness and loneliness, however, can be rudely impacted by the unwelcome hustle and bustle of jet skiers, swimmers, speed boaters, other fishermen, or general shore activity. My goal was to find, and share with you, hidden largemouth bass fishing spots scattered throughout Androscoggin, Sagadahoc, and Lincoln Counties. I focused on smaller ponds less than about 50 acres in size, located mostly off the beaten track but still readily accessible by car (no need for 4X4 driving or hiking through the woods!). I also avoided ponds with excessive shore development. A small motorized boat could be launched on a few of these ponds, but most are fishable only by hand-carried craft, such as a canoe or kayak.

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Largemouth bass fishing on Bradley Pond in Lovell, Maine (September 7, 2013)

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View of Bradley Pond from the public access point

View of Bradley Pond from the public access point

Bradley Pond is a 34-acre body of water located in Lovell, Oxford County, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 10 D2). The pond is accessible via an unimproved, town-owned public launch. Drive south on Route 5 towards Center Lovell. Turn left on Bradley Pond Road  just before reaching North Lovell. Drive for 0.8 miles on this well-maintained gravel road and keep right at the split. Go for another 0.2 miles. The public launch is on the left, across from a big house. Note that motorboats are prohibited on this pond and that only small hand-carried craft can be launched from the access point.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Proctor Pond in Albany Township, Maine (September 7, 2013)

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Access point to Proctor Pond

Access point to Proctor Pond

Proctor Pond is a 45-acre body of water located in Albany Township, Oxford County, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 10 D3). Public access is a challenge. It took me a good 45 minutes of driving all around the pond to find a way in. The reason is that much of the waterfront is privately owned, plus the pond is surrounded by a dense network of gravel roads, four wheeler roads, and snowmobile trails which seemingly go everywhere and nowhere. An easier way in may exist than the one explained below; if so, please feel free to share that information in the comment section at the end of this blog.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Webber Pond in Sweden, Maine (September 7, 2013)

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View from the access point to Webber Pond

View from the access point to Webber Pond

Webber Pond is a 32-acre body of water located in Sweden, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 10 E3). Drive north on Route 93 towards Sweden. Turn left on Webber Pond Road. The pond will appear on the left side after about 1.5 miles (past Beaver Dam Road). Look for mailbox #150. The way into the pond is across from that mailbox. Beware that the trail is blocked by big boulders.  Only small portable boats such as canoes or kayaks have access to the pond and need to be carried in for about 300 ft. I did not see any “No Trespassing” signs on the trail and so assume that this is a legitimate way in. A public boat launch is not available.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Pickerel Pond in Denmark, Maine (September 1, 2013)

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Rough access point to Pickerel Pond

Rough access point to Pickerel Pond

Pickerel Pond is a 40-acre body of water located in Denmark, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 B4). Drive north on Route 107 towards Bridgeton and turn left on Swamp Road. Turn right at the stop sign after about 1 mile and continue for 0.8 miles on Hancock Pond Road. Veer right at the dirt road and go straight for several 100 ft. The pond will appear on the right and is accessible via a rough boat launch on its southwestern corner. The launch can only accommodate small hand-carried craft, such as a canoe or kayak. A public boat launch is not available.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Spectacle Pond #1 in Porter, Maine (September 1, 2013)

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The rough footpath leading to the access point on Spectacle Pond #1

The rough footpath leading to the access point on Spectacle Pond #1

Spectacle Pond #1 is a 57-acre body of water located in Porter, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 D2. Note also that on the attached Google Map above, the target pond is the one just below the red pin). Drive north from South Hiram/Kezar Falls unto Spec Pond Road. Follow this road for about 1.0 mile. The pond can be accessed two different ways, as follows: (a) Drive up to mailbox #50 (located just before Little Lane) on Spec Pond Road and turn right on the open area, from which a rough forest road snakes it way towards the pond.  I say “snake” because the road is narrow and curvy and is hemmed in by small trees at several locations. I didn’t try to drive my small car down it, but I suspect that a larger pickup truck may have more trouble getting through. The road ends at a sandy area with a fire pit overlooking the pond. (b) Stay on Spec Pond Road and drive past Little Lane for just under 0.2 miles. A rough foot path shoots down towards the pond on the right. Park your vehicle on the shoulder of the road.

 

 

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