TOP 5 Brook Trout Ponds for the 2014 Spring Fishing Season in Cumberland County, Maine

This blog identifies the ponds in Cumberland County, Maine that provide the best odds of catching brook trout during the spring of 2014. Most of these ponds cover less than 50 acres and are therefore relatively small. Some ponds can be fished from shore, but most are best fished from a canoe or other small craft. The action on these bodies of water can be fast and furious in the spring. Trout activity typically peaks between late April and early June, after which the fishing slows down in response to rising surface water temperatures.

The TOP 5 brook trout ponds in Cumberland County for the spring of 2014 are highlighted below in alphabetical order. A pond is considered TOP due to its trout stocking density: after all, everything else being equal, the more brook trout that are stocked per acre of pond, the greater the chances of catching those fish.

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The hottest trout fishing ponds for the spring of 2014 in southern New Jersey

This blog identifies the ponds in southern New Jersey that provide the best odds of catching trout during the spring of 2014. For the purpose of this blog, southern New Jersey covers Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Glouchester, Ocean, and Salem counties. The fishing action on these bodies of water can be fast and furious in the spring. Trout activity typically peaks for three or four weeks between mid-April and mid-May, after which the bite slows down due to rising surface water temperatures.

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The hottest trout fishing ponds for the Spring of 2014 in Central New Jersey

This blog identifies the ponds in central New Jersey that provide the best odds of catching trout during the spring of 2014. For the purpose of this blog, central New Jersey covers Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, and Somerset counties. The fishing action on these bodies of water can be fast and furious in the spring. Trout activity typically peaks for three or four weeks between mid-April and mid-May, after which the bite slows down due to rising surface water temperatures.

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The hottest trout fishing ponds for spring 2014 in northwestern New Jersey

This blog identifies the ponds in northwestern New Jersey that provide the best odds of catching trout during the spring of 2014. For the purpose of this blog, northwestern New Jersey covers Morris, Passaic, Sussex, and Warren counties. The fishing action on these bodies of water can be fast and furious in the spring. Trout activity typically peaks for three or four weeks between mid-April and mid-May, after which the bite slows down due to rising surface water temperatures.

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The hottest trout fishing ponds for the spring of 2014 in Northeastern New Jersey

This blog identifies the ponds in northeastern New Jersey that provide the best odds of catching trout during the spring of 2014. For the purpose of this blog, northeastern New Jersey covers Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Passaic, and Union counties. The fishing action on these bodies of water can be fast and furious in the spring. Trout activity typically peaks for three or four weeks between mid-April and mid-May, after which the bite slows down due to rising surface water temperatures.

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Fishing for landlocked Atlantic salmon in Acadia National Park, Maine

Acadia National Park is a major jewel in the National Park Service crown. It is located on Mount Desert Island along the rugged coast of Downeast Maine in Hancock County. The State stocks four ponds within the boundary of the Park with landlocked Atlantic salmon. These four water bodies are open to year-round fishing. However, keep in mind that these fisheries are highly regulated in order to preserve their exceptional quality, the scenic beauty, and the Park experience. It is greatly recommended to carefully read the latest fishing regulations in order to understand all of the restrictions and limitations that apply to these bodies of water. Click here for more information on buying a Maine fishing license on-line.

Only when the water is relatively cool in the spring can salmon be caught near the surface using dry flies and trolling with live bait, spoons, or wet flies. Most summer visitors to the Pak interested in pursuing these magnificent creatures will need to use downriggers or lead core line in order to place their lures in the deeper, colder waters below the thermocline where the salmon will be hiding. Click here for more information on trolling for landlocked salmon.

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Ten fabulous largemouth bass ponds in southern Oxford County, Maine

Fishing for largemouth bass is a cherished summer activity for many fishermen in Maine. The desired quietness and loneliness, however, can be rudely impacted by the unwelcome hustle and bustle of jet skiers, swimmers, speed boaters, other fishermen, or general shore activity. My goal was to find, and share with you, hidden largemouth bass fishing spots scattered throughout southern Oxford County, defined here as that part of the county situated south of the Androscoggin River. I focused on smaller ponds less than about 50 acres in size, located mostly off the beaten track but still readily accessible by car (no need for 4X4 driving or hiking through the woods!). I also avoided ponds with excessive shore development. A small motorized boat could be launched on a few of these ponds, but most are fishable only by hand-carried craft, such as a canoe or kayak. This selection process ensures that you will likely be fishing all by yourself in unspoiled, quiet, natural surroundings. The ponds are also small enough that they can be covered in a lazy afternoon or a long summer evening. Finally, I fished each one of them to ensure that they contain largemouth bass, which they did!  Click here for an overview of the lures I like to use on these fish. I’ve also identified fabulous largemouth bass ponds in York County, Cumberland County, and south coastal Maine.

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Largemouth bass fishing on South Pond in Buckfield, Maine (September 14, 2013)

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View of South Pond from the rough launch

View of South Pond from the rough launch

South Pond is a 49-acre body of water located in Buckfield, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 11 C3). Drive east on Route 117 towards Buckfield, pass Sodom Road, and turn right on John Ellingwood Road after another mile or so. Go down this hard-top road for 0.1 mile and take the dirt road on the right (going straight will put you into a municipal parking lot). Drive down this remarkably-straight dirt road for 1.5 miles. The pond and its access point will appear on the right. Another access point is located at the end of the pond further down the dirt road.  Only small hand-carried craft, such as a canoe or kayak, can be launched from either access points. A public boat launch is not available.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Mud Pond in Greenwood, Maine (September 14, 2013)

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View of Mud Pond from the rough boat launch

View of Mud Pond from the rough boat launch

Mud Pond is a 52-acre body of water located in Greenwood, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 10 C5). Drive north on Greenwood Road towards the town of Greenwood. The pond will appear to the left side, right next to the road. The unimproved access point is located through a copse of trees. Parking is on a small grassy area alongside the road. Only small hand-carried craft, such as a canoe or kayak, can be launched from this point. A public boat launch is not available.

 

 

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Trout fishing on Otter Pond #2, Standish, Maine (November 10, 2013)

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General view of Otter Pond #2

General view of Otter Pond #2

Otter Pond #2 is a 12-acre body of water located in Standish, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D1; note that on the Google map above, Otter Pond #2 is the pond just below the one indicated by the red pin). Read this blog for directions on how to access this pond. Otter Pond #2 is a widely popular spot for early ice fishing, but gets little or no pressure in the fall after it is stocked for the winter season.  My son Joel and I arrive at the largest of the two parking lots off Route 35 by 8:15 am. As expected, we’re all by ourselves, which suits us just fine. We place his canoe on canoe wheels, load up the car battery, electric trolling engine, and our fishing gear in the boat, and haul everything down the Mountain Division Trail to our destination. I checked the stocking report on-line the day before; the State released a truckload of brookies in this pond last week which should make for good fishing.

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