Brook trout fishing on Nesowadnehunk Stream, Baxter State Park, Maine (September 28, 2016)

Bushwhacking is required in order to find the secret honey holes...

Be ready to bushwhack in order to find the secret honey holes…

Nesowadnehunk Stream is a tributary of the west branch of the Penobscot River with its source located at the outlet of Nesowadnehunk Lake. This 17-mile stream flows roughly along the western and southern boundary of Baxter State Park (BSP) in northern Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 50; the outlet of Nesowadnehunk lake is on map 50 B4). About three quarters of the stream runs approximately parallel to the Park Tote Road which connects the south entrance (i.e., Togue Pond Gate) to the north entrance (i.e., Matagamon Gate) of BSP. The surrounding watershed is hilly and deeply forested with a mixture of evergreen and deciduous trees. The stream is typically 20 to 40 ft wide and has a depth ranging from < 1 ft to > 4 ft. Depending on the location, the substrate varies from soft silty mud, to coarse gravel, to exposed bedrock, to boulders. Fishing on this stream is particularly enjoyable in late summer-early fall due to the cooling surface water and the total lack of black flies, mosquitos and deer flies which can drive even the most dedicated angler to insanity in the spring. Keep in mind that open-water fishing in this part of Maine ends on September 30, whereas BSP closes for the season on October 15.

 

 

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Eight fabulous largemouth bass ponds in Kennebec County, Maine

 

Fishing for largemouth bass is a cherished summer activity for many anglers in Maine. The desired quietness and loneliness, however, can be rudely impacted by the unwelcome hustle and bustle of jet skiers, swimmers, speed boaters, other fishermen, or general shore activity. My goal was to find, and share with you, hidden largemouth bass fishing spots scattered throughout Kennebec County. I focused on smaller ponds less than about 100 acres in size, located mostly off the beaten track but still readily accessible by car (no need for 4X4 driving or too much hiking through the woods!). I also avoided ponds with excessive shore development. A small motorized boat could be launched on a few of these ponds, but most are fishable only by hand-carried craft, such as a canoe or kayak. This selection process ensures that you will likely be fishing all by yourself in unspoiled, quiet, natural surroundings. The ponds are also small enough that they can be covered in a lazy afternoon or a long summer evening. Finally, I fished each one of them to ensure that they contain largemouth bass, which they did! The bass fishing rules for all of these “fabulous” ponds fall under the general fishing regulations.¬†Click here for an overview of the lures I like to use on these¬†fish. In addition, check out the fabulous largemouth bass ponds in York County, Cumberland County, southern Oxford County, and south coastal Maine.

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Largemouth bass fishing on Weary Pond, Whitefield, Maine (September 18, 2016)

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View of Wearey Pond looking north

View of Wearey Pond looking north

Weary Pond is a 42-acre body of water located in Whitefield, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 13 D2). I try to reach this pond by driving south on Weary Pond Road off Hilton Road in North Whitefield. Weary Pond Road is rough and unimproved. I have to turn around after driving for about half a mile when I hit a stretch that is too bouldery for my little front wheel-drive car. I successfully reach my intended destination by driving north for 0.8 miles on Weary Pond Road off Jewett Lane in Whitefield. Jewett Lane is a solid four-season gravel road, whereas Weary Pond Road from this end is still unmaintained and rough but passable with a normal car. The pond becomes visible on the right through the trees. Park your vehicle as best as possible on the side of the forest trail. A boat launch is not available. Hence, only hand-carried craft can be used and need to be transported for about 300 ft or so through the woods from the road to the pond. But the destination is well worth the effort!!

 

 

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