Largemouth bass fishing on Moose Pond in Bridgeton, Maine (July 19, 2014)

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View of the shoreline in the Upper Basin

View of the shoreline in the Upper Basin

Moose Pond is a 1,694-acre body of water which straddles the towns of Denmark and Sweden in Oxford County, and Bridgeton in Cumberland County (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer Map 4 A&B3). An excellent hard-top boat launch is located on Route 302 on the eastern end of the causeway. A second hard-top boat launch (which I did not visit) is located at the southern end of the lake off Denmark Road in Denmark, less than a mile north of Route 160 (a.k.a. West Main Street; see the Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 B3). I also noticed what appears to be a dirt launch for canoes and kayaks facing the Upper Basin on the wooded island which links to Route 302 about halfway down the causeway.  Moose Pond is a highly-popular regional destination for both open-water fishing in the spring, summer, and fall and for ice fishing in the winter. It consistently yields serious lake trout and landlocked salmon every year, particularly through the ice, but also during spring trolling. The largemouth and smallmouth bass populations are robust enough to support tournament fishing.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Webster’s Mill Pond, Limington, Maine (July 12, 2014)

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The sandy boat launch of Webster's Mill Pond could accommodate small trailered boats

The sandy boat launch of Webster’s Mill Pond can accommodate small trailered boats

Webster’s Mill Pond (also known as North Limington Pond) is a 40-acre body of water located in Limington, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 4 D4). The pond, which sits at the intersection of Route 11 (Sokokis Avenue) and Route 25 (Ossipee Trail), is easily reached from Route 11. An unimproved sandy boat launch allows access to small trailered boats. The section of the pond along Route 11 is a popular spot to fish from shore. However, the most productive approach by far is to fish from a small craft.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Smallmouth bass fishing on Dundee Pond, Windham, Maine (July 12, 2014)

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General view if Dundee Pond: calm, serene, and all to ourselves!

General view if Dundee Pond: calm, serene, and all to ourselves!

Dundee Pond is a 197-acre body of water located in Windham and Gorham, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 5 D2). A public launch is located off Windham Center Road right below the North Gorham Pond Dam in Windham. This access point has parking for about eight cars but can only accommodate hand-carried craft. The stretch of water between the launch and the pond itself consists of about a quarter mile of the Presumpscot River. The current is steady and relatively strong which requires kayakers and canoeists to paddle their way back up after they’re done fishing on the pond. An alternative approach, which bypasses this flowing water altogether, is to launch an hand-carried craft from the sandy beach at Dundee Park located at the end of Dundee Road off River Road in Windham. The park is open from 8 am until sunset but charges an entry fee of $4 per adult (12 years and older) and $2 per child (2 to12 years). Click here for more information. I also attempted to access the pond at the Dundee Pond dam located at the end of Dundee Road (off Hurricane Road in Gorham) but turned around when I noticed that the road was posted as “no trespassing”.

 

 

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Largemouth bass fishing on Alewife Pond, Kennebunk, Maine (June 29, 2014)

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The entrance marker on Cole Road to the Alewife Woods Preserve

The entrance marker on Cole Road to the Alewife Woods Preserve

Alewife Pond is a 37-acre body of water located in Kennebunk, Maine (see The Maine Atlas and Gazetteer map 2 C5). The pond is accessible by driving north on Cole Road from Alfred Road for about 0.6 miles, and turning right on the Alewife Woods Preserve (look for the sign on the right of the road). Leave your car at the small parking lot about 300 ft in. The 625-acre Preserve is owned and managed by the Kennebunk Land Trust. The Preserve is well worth a visit for its quiet, wooded and isolated setting within a short drive of several popular nearby coastal resorts. It has 2.5 miles of easy trails to support outdoors activities in the summer (e.g., walking, bird watching, dirt biking) and winter (e.g., snow shoeing and cross-country skiing). Fires, motorized vehicles, and camping are not allowed. Click here for more information on the Preserve.

 

 

 

 

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